Undergraduate Studies

Undergraduate Admission to Hood

Admission to Hood College is competitive and is offered to students who have outstanding academic credentials and personal characteristics indicating they will contribute to the diversity and richness of the campus. Applicants are selected on the strength of their academic record, standardized test (optional)scores, character and leadership potential and co-curricular activities.

Undergraduate Admission Options

Hood offers four different avenues for admission to its undergraduate programs:

First-year student admission —intended for students who are in secondary school, or who have graduated recently from high school and have never enrolled at another college;

Transfer admission —intended for students who have graduated from secondary school and have matriculated at another college or university;

International student admission —intended for students who are not citizens of the United States and have graduated from secondary school or are looking to transfer from another college or university;

Hood Start —a program for exceptional high school juniors and seniors that allows them to take college courses for credit while in high school.

Campus Visits

Campus visits are encouraged for all prospective students. The undergraduate Admission Office schedules appointments for interviews and campus tours, and also hosts numerous campus visit programs through the year. Campus visits may be arranged online at www.hood.edu/visit or by contacting the Office of Admission at 301-696-3400.

Contact information for undergraduate admission at Hood is as follows:

www.hood.edu

Toll-free: 800-922-1599

Telephone: 301-696-3400

Fax: 301-696-3819

Email:

admission@hood.edu

transfers@hood.edu

international@hood.edu

Applying for Admission—First-year students

Hood College requires the following items as part of its first-year application process:

  • A completed application for admission. The application is available online at www.hood.edu/apply or www.commonapp.org.
  • A $35 application fee (the fee will be waived for students submitting an online application). Applicants who are not able to pay the fee due to financial circumstances may request a fee waiver by having their high school guidance counselor submit an official Fee Waiver request on their behalf.
  • A Secondary School Report form, completed by the student’s guidance counselor.
  • A letter of recommendation from a counselor or teacher the student has had in an academic courses.
  • Official high school transcript, sent directly from the high school to the Office of Admission.
  • Official results of the SAT or ACT examination (unless the student is applying Test-Optional. See below). If the test scores appear on the high school transcript, the student will not need to submit additional score reports.
  • An essay is required. Topics are listed on the application for admission.

In some cases, the Admission Office may request additional supporting information in order to reach a final admission decision.

All applicants for first-year student admission are expected to have completed a full college preparatory curriculum, including the following:

  • 4 credits of English
  • 3 credits of mathematics, 4 credits preferred (including at least Algebra I and II and geometry)
  • 3 credits of laboratory or natural science
  • 3 credits of social science
  • 2 credits of the same foreign language
  • one academic elective

For information regarding International Baccalaureate, Advanced Placement, credit by examination and transfer credit policies, please see Undergraduate Academic Policies.

Test Optional Policy

Hood College evaluates students on the basis of their academic preparation, talents, and interests, as well as Hood College’s ability to help them achieve their educational and career goals. Understanding that standardized test scores may not be the best indication of an academically prepared student, Hood College offers the Test Optional Choice.

Test Optional Choice candidates will be evaluated based on the rigor of the high school curriculum, GPA, class rank (if available), letters of recommendation, essay and extracurricular and community activities. An on-campus interview is highly recommended. Interested applicants should have a minimum GPA of 3.25 on a 4.0 scale.

Applying for Admission—Home-schooled Students

Hood College recognizes that a growing number of students and families may choose a home-schooling alternative in place of a traditional secondary school experience. In order to accurately assess a home-schooled applicant’s likelihood of success at Hood, we will require several forms of documentation in addition to the usual application materials.

Applicants for admission to Hood College who have completed some or all of their secondary education in a home-schooling environment will be required to submit the following:

  • A transcript of all high school-level work, evaluated, signed and approved by a certifying home school agency or evaluator.
  • Two letters of recommendation (with at least one from outside the home)
  • An admission interview
  • Official transcript of any college work completed or in progress.

If the student does not have a high school diploma or has not completed high school, we will require the results of an official GED examination. The Departments of Education in several states (notably, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, New York and the District of Columbia) do not recognize a home schooling certificate as an equivalent to a high school diploma. The College must be able to certify that all degree-seeking students hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, or have proven the ability to benefit from a college education.

Transfer with Ease

Hood welcomes transfer students at every stage in their academic and professional lives. Our transfer agreements with other colleges help ease the admission process and guide students in their efforts to take appropriate courses prior to transferring to Hood. Students transferring to Hood from a community college are encouraged to enroll in classes that meet requirements for an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, or an Associate of Arts in Teaching degree

Community college students are urged to consult their transfer counselor concerning transfer agreement and course equivalencies, or contact the Office of Admission.

The registrar evaluates prior college coursework after the point of admission for applicability to degree requirements at Hood College. Credit is generally awarded for courses that are clearly applicable to a baccalaureate degree and for which the student earned a grade of C- or above. Courses that are clearly vocational or occupational in nature will not be accepted as credit toward the baccalaureate degree. A maximum of 62 credits may be awarded for freshman and sophomore level work completed elsewhere. Although there is no limit for junior and senior level coursework, students will be awarded no more than a total of 94 credits for all college-level work completed.

For detailed information on transfer credit policies, see Undergraduate Academic Policies, Transfer Policy.

Applying for Admission—Transfer Students

Students who have an enrollment record at any college after their graduation from high school are considered a transfer student and should use the transfer application. Any student with a college GPA and more than 11 transferable credits at the time of application will be evaluated primarily on the basis of their prior college record. Transfer students should submit the following materials for consideration:

  • A completed Hood College transfer application. The Hood application can be found at www.hood.edu/apply. There is no fee for this online application.
  • Official college transcript(s), sent directly from the college or university registrar to the Office of Admission.
  • If you have been placed on probation, suspended, had disciplinary action or been dismissed from a college or university, you may be required to submit the College/University Report for Transfer Students, completed by the academic adviser, registrar or dean of students at the student’s most recently-attended institution.
Completed College Credits Type of Application Required Materials
24+ Transfer Official transcripts from all colleges attended
0-23 Transfer Official transcripts from all colleges attended, official high school transcript, official SAT and/or ACT scores if graduation from high school was less than three years ago

Applying for Admission—International Students

Application deadlines for all international students: Fall – June 15, Spring – November 15

International students, whether in the United States or abroad, may apply for admission as a first-year student or transfer student. International applicants are encouraged to submit their applications online. Applicants should note that all documents submitted as part of the admission process become the property of Hood College and will not be returned.

International first-year student applicants must have completed their secondary education or plan to complete it by the semester prior to enrollment. Applications that include all of the materials listed below will be reviewed for admission:

  • A completed Hood College Application or Common Application (www.commonapp.com) for admission. Please remember to include an email address with your application to help make future communication easier. The Hood application is available in paper or electronic versions. The electronic version can be found at www.hood.edu/apply.
  • A writing sample. This can be an essay on a topic of your choice or a previously graded paper.
  • Academic Recommendations. Applicants will need two (2) letters of recommendation. One (1) from a guidance director, guidance counselor, principal, or headmaster, and one (1) from an academic instructor from your most recent place of study. If you are currently enrolled in an English as a Second Language (ESL) program, please have your ESL instructor provide your recommendation
  • Official Secondary School (High School) Transcript. Effective immediately, international transcripts will only be accepted for consideration at Hood College if they have been translated and evaluated by a professional organization. We require a course- by-course evaluation. Please visit National Association of Credential Evaluation Services or Hood’s website for a list of acceptable credit evaluation agencies.
  • Official TOEFL Profile, IELTS Profile, SAT Profile or ACT Profile TOEFL minimum score of 79-80 Internet based/550 paper based/213 computer based, IELTS minimum score of 6.5, SAT minimum score 1050 composite (critical reading and math sections) or ACT minimum of 22 composite. TOEFL or IELTS are the preferred tests for students from non-English speaking nations. Students with scores below these numbers may also apply.
  • Financial Information:
    • If applying for an F-1 visa, you must complete the Hood College Undergraduate International application and provide the requested financial information.
    • If applying as a student under an immigration status other than permanent resident, please contact the Admission Office for details about which materials you may be required to submit.
    • A student may choose to use the College Board International Student Financial Aid Application and International Student Certification of Finances form to explain their financial situation, as long as they also submit supporting documents such as bank statements.

Optional information that will facilitate the admission decision:

  • While not required, an additional essay on a topic of your choice and recommendation(s) from academic instructor(s) about your performance and ability will facilitate the admission decision.

International Transfer applicants

Applications that include all of the materials listed below will be reviewed for admission:

  • A completed Hood College Transfer Application and the International Transfer application supplement. Please remember to include an email address with your application to help make future communication easier. The Hood application is available in paper or electronic versions. The electronic version can be found at www.hood.edu/admission.
  • A writing sample. This can be an essay on a topic of your choice or a previously graded paper.
  • Official copies of all College/University Transcripts. Effective immediately, international transcripts will only be accepted for consideration at Hood College if they have been translated and evaluated by a professional organization. We require a course-by-course evaluation. Please visit National Association of Credential Evaluation Services at Hood’s website for a list of acceptable credit evaluation agencies.

The following documents are required if you have less than 24 transferable college credits:

  • Official secondary school (high school) transcript along with secondary school report form. Effective immediately, international transcripts will only be accepted for consideration at Hood College if they have been translated and evaluated by a professional organization. We require a course-by-course evaluation. Please visit National Association of Credential Evaluation Services or Hood’s website for a list of acceptable credit evaluation agencies.
  • Academic Recommendation. Recommendations should be from a teacher or professor at the most recent college or university attended.
  • Official results of the SAT (minimum composite score of 1050) or ACT (minimum composite score of 22) examination if the student’s first language is English.
  • Official TOEFL Profile, IELTS Profile, SAT Profile or ACT Profile. TOEFL minimum score of 79-80 Internet based/550 paper based/213 computer based, IELTS minimum score of 6.5, SAT minimum score 1050 composite (critical reading and math sections) or ACT minimum of 22 composite. TOEFL or IELTS are the preferred tests for students from non-English speaking nations. Students with scores below these numbers may also apply.
  • Financial Information:
    • If applying for an F-1 visa, you must complete the Hood College Undergraduate International application and provide the requested financial information.
    • If applying as a student under an immigration status other than permanent resident, please contact the Admission Office for details about which materials you may be required to submit.
    • A student may choose to use the College Board International Student Financial Aid Application and International Student Certification of Finances form to explain their financial situation, as long as they also submit supporting documents such as bank statements.

Optional information that will facilitate the admission decision:

  • While not required, an additional essay on a topic of your choice and recommendation(s) from academic instructor(s) about your performance and ability will facilitate the admission decision.

Hood Start

The Hood Start program allows exceptional high school juniors and seniors to get a head start on the college academic experience, earning college credits while in high school. The program is designed to help students become familiar with academic work at the college level and to interact with College faculty. Depending on their high school schedule, Hood Start students typically take 1-3 classes per semester. A maximum of 18 credits may be earned through the Hood Start program. Hood Start students may not exceed 11 credits in any given semester. Enrollment is on a space available basis.

Students may enroll in the fall, spring or summer semesters, and have the opportunity to discuss academic goals and post-secondary options with a Hood College academic adviser. Most classes at the 100- and 200-level are open to Hood Start students; they may enroll in 300-level courses when the prerequisites have been met or with permission of the instructor. Hood Start students pay reduced tuition at $155 per credit and are responsible for additional fees (lab, music practice rooms, parking permit), required course material and books.

Hood Start Admission Requirements:
  • Be a high school junior or senior.
  • Have a cumulative unweighted grade point average of 3.50 or greater in a college preparatory, honors, Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate curriculum.
  • Have a minimum composite SAT score of 1150 (critical reading and math sections), a comparable PSAT score, a composite ACT score of 25, or comparable PLAN score.

Hood Start applicants will be required to:

  • Complete a Hood Start application form and essay.
  • Submit a transcript of high school work.
  • Submit SAT, PSAT and/or ACT score reports.
  • Submit School Report/Counselor Evaluation.
  • Submit Teaching Recommendation from an academic teacher who has taught you during the past two years.
  • Have a personal interview with either the Hood Start coordinator in the Office of Admission.

Hood Start students are guaranteed admission into Hood College upon successful completion of Hood Start classes and high school degree requirements. Students interested in the Hood Start program must apply through the Admission Office; for information contact 301-696-3400, admission@hood.edu or www.hood.edu.

Complete and submit the Hood Start application by: Fall semester – August 15, Spring semester – December 15


Application Deadlines and Reply Dates

Admission to Hood College is offered on a rolling basis. Students applying for the fall semester are encouraged to apply before January 1st. Applications for the spring semester should be received by December 1st.

Enrollment Deposit

To confirm enrollment at Hood, all new undergraduate students are required to pay a one-time enrollment deposit. The enrollment deposit is $350. An additional housing deposit of $300 is required for all students who reside on campus. The deposits are applied in-full to tuition, housing and fees.

The deadline for payment of the enrollment deposit is May 1 for the fall semester and December 15 for students starting in the spring semester. The enrollment deposit is not refundable after these dates.

Appeal Process

Our admission process for first-year, transfer and international students entails a thorough, review of each application. It is unusual for a decision to be reversed. The Office of Admission will review a written appeal if the applicant can provide significant new information to consider. If there are grounds for an appeal because of new information, please follow the steps outlined below:

Appeal Process:

  1. Appeals must be made in writing within 14 days of receiving notification of the initial admission decision. Appeals should be sent to the attention of the Director of Admission.
  2. Appeals must be accompanied by supporting documentation such as new grades, updated standardized test scores, additional letters of recommendation, or other appropriate documentation.
  3. Appeals will be reviewed by the Director of Admission and other members of the Hood College staff and/or faculty as needed.
  4. A decision on an appeal will generally be made within 30 days of receipt of the written appeal.
  5. The final decision on all appeals will be made by the Vice President for Enrollment Management.
  6. An applicant may only appeal their admission decision one time.
  7. An applicant denied admission may apply in a subsequent year with new information to their application.

Deferred Admission

Students are admitted for the term for which they originally applied, unless they notify the Admission Office that they are unable to enroll for that term due to unusual or personal circumstances. Admitted students are permitted to defer their enrollment for up to 12 months, provided they do not alter their original admission status by completing additional coursework at another institution in the interim. Students who are deferring their admission must pay the enrollment deposit to hold their space in the class.

If an admitted student defers enrollment, and then attends another institution (whether coursework is completed or not), that student will need to be re-evaluated for both admission and for merit scholarships.

Equal Access for Students with Disabilities

Hood College actively supports the rights of students with disabilities to have equal access to education. In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Hood makes every reasonable effort to accommodate the needs of students with disabilities.

In order to receive appropriate advice and accommodations, students who have a disability must notify The Josephine Steiner Center for Academic Achievement and Retention as soon as possible. Early notification prevents delay in initiation of services and ensures the student full access to educational activities. The disability services coordinator and/or the medical staff, in consultation with the student, prepares a plan for services and forwards authorization for specified services (such as note-taking, interpreting, special housing) to the appropriate offices on campus.

Undergraduate Tuition and Financial Aid

Costs

Tuition, Fees and Other Charges for the 2014-2015 Academic Year

Costs
Tuition, Fees and Other Charges for the 2014-2015 Academic Year

Refer to Tuition and Fees at http://www.hood.edu/accounting for future pricing information.

All fees listed are per semester.

FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE RESIDENT COMMUTER
Tuition - 12 to 18.5 credit hours $ 16,810 $ 16,810
Room - Shared $ 3,040
Room - Single $ 3,425
Room - Apartment $ 3,170
Board - Unlimited 19-meal plan (required of first-year students) $ 2,765
Board - 15-meal plan $ 2,690
Board - 10-meal plan $ 2,620
Board - Commuter & off-campus resident meal plan $795
Comprehensive Fee $ 250 $250
PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE
Tuition per credit hour $975
Audit Fee per credit hour $485
Comprehensive Fee $160
Comprehensive fee per term $100 (winter, summer I, summer II)
Hood Start $155 per credit

Payment of tuition, fees and other charges is due generally one week before the start of the fall and spring semesters and by the first day of class for the summer terms. Students registering after the deadline must make payment at the time of registration. Students may pay their tuition using the Monthly Payment Plan. Information on this option can be found at www.hood.edu/paymentplan or by calling the Accounting Office at 301-696-3609.

Referral to Collection Agency

By registering for classes, the student agrees that in the event the student becomes delinquent or defaults in paying charges due to Hood College, the student agrees to reimburse Hood College the fees of any collection agency, which may be based on a percentage at a maximum of 33 1/3% of the debt, and all cost and expenses, including reasonable attorney’s fees, Hood College incurs in such collection efforts.

Withdrawal from the College and Refund Policy

Fall and Spring Semesters

Students who withdraw from Hood will have their fall and spring semester charges adjusted according to the schedule below:

If a student withdraws from the College: Tuition Board
Prior to beginning of the semester 100 percent 100 percent
Within the 14 calendar days from the first day of the semester 80 percent pro rata weekly

(See the current College calendar for the actual dates.)

There are no refunds of the room fee after the first day of classes. There are no refunds of tuition after the end of the drop-add period. Refunds of the board fee are continued on a pro rata weekly basis throughout the semester. There are no refunds of any fees (comprehensive, academic records, course audit, student teaching, parking or student health insurance) once the semester has begun. This refund policy applies to students who withdraw from the College and to those who take a leave-of-absence during the semester.

Withdrawal refunds are determined by the effective date noted on the Change of Status or Leave of Absence Form filed with the Registrar’s Office for undergraduate students and the written withdrawal files with the Graduate Office for graduate students.

The Office of Financial Aid is required to recalculate federal financial aid eligibility for students who withdraw. Up through 60 percent of the semester, a pro rata schedule is used to determine how much federal aid a student has earned at the time of withdrawal. The portion of unearned aid must be returned to the federal programs. When unearned aid is returned, a student may owe the College additional funds.

Summer Terms

One-week and two-week terms Tuition
Prior to first meeting of class 100 percent
Within the first 2 days from the first day of the term 80 percent
3rd day and thereafter no refund
Three-week and four-week terms
Prior to first meeting of class 100 percent
Within the first 4 days from the first day of the term 80 percent
5th day and thereafter no refund
Five-week and six-week terms
Prior to first meeting of class 100 percent
Within the first 7 calendar days from the first day of the term 80 percent
8th calendar day and thereafter no refund

The Need-based Financial Aid System

For students whose personal and family resources are insufficient to meet their total educational expenses, Hood administers both need-based and non-need-based financial aid and offers personalized assistance in obtaining other educational resources from outside sources.

Hood College determines the type and amount of aid students may receive by evaluating the student’s financial need and availability of funds. Eligible students receive awards on a first-come, first-served basis.

Financial Need

To determine a student’s financial need, the student must complete the Free Application For Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Need for financial aid is determined by the following calculation:

Cost of Attendance (COA) Less Expected Family Contribution (EFC) Equals Financial Need

To determine the EFC, the calculation formula used is the Federal Need Analysis set by the U.S. Department of Education. Factors that are taken into consideration include: family size, number of students in college, income and assets of both the student and parents and the age of the oldest parent.

Complete the FAFSA fully and carefully to avoid delays in processing. FAFSA forms should be submitted online no later than February 15 to receive full consideration for all types of need-based aid. For Hood College to receive FAFSA results, list Hood’s school code, 002076, on the application.

Financial Aid Package

After financial need is determined, the Office of Financial Aid can begin to put together a financial aid “package.” Each student’s financial situation is different, so each financial aid package is unique. A financial aid package will include one or more types of financial aid. The most common types of financial aid include: scholarships, grants, loans and work-study.

All need-based financial aid awards are made in accordance with three criteria: enrollment in a degree-granting program at Hood College, demonstrated financial need and the student’s ability to maintain satisfactory academic progress. For many of the need-based financial aid programs, students must be enrolled for at least 6 credits per semester. In addition, for a student to be eligible for any federal financial aid, the student must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the United States; have a high school diploma or equivalent; not be in default on a Federal Perkins Loan or Federal Stafford Loan; and be registered with Selective Service (if required).

Students who qualify for financial aid are notified in the form of a financial aid award letter.

This award letter is sent to admitted students in the spring prior to the academic year for which financial assistance is sought. Continuing students will receive their award letters beginning in April prior to the fall semester upon receipt of their renewal application for financial aid and any other required documents.

All financial aid forms are located on the Financial Aid page of the Hood website.

Financial Aid Programs

Federal Pell Grants

Awarded to undergraduate students with demonstrated financial need. Prorated awards may be made to eligible part-time students. Students must be pursuing their first baccalaureate degree.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

Awarded to undergraduate students with the greatest demonstrated financial need. Students must be pursuing their first baccalaureate degree.

Hood Grants

Awarded to full-time undergraduates who demonstrate financial need. Funding is limited. Students must be pursuing their first baccalaureate degree upon initial enrollment.

Federal Perkins Loans

Loans for undergraduate students demonstrating financial need are made at 5 percent simple interest. No interest accrues while in school and repayment does not begin until nine months after the recipient leaves Hood College. Loans are dependent upon financial need.

Federal Work Study Program

This federally-funded need-based employment program enables eligible undergraduate students to earn money for miscellaneous expenses while gaining practical experience in on- and off-campus jobs.

Campus Employment

Awarded to students who are not eligible for federal work-study. Funded and administered by Hood College. Limited number of positions are available.

Federal Direct Subsidized Loan

A need-based student loan program offered to undergraduate and graduate students. The interest rate is fixed. No interest accrues and generally no payments are due while a student is enrolled on at least a half-time basis. Repayment generally begins six months after leaving Hood College.

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Direct Loan

A non-need-based student loan program offered to undergraduate students. The interest rate is fixed. The six-month deferment applies only to repayment on the principal. Interest accrues when the loan is disbursed. Students are mailed quarterly interest statements at which time they may elect to pay the interest.

Federal Direct PLUS Loan

Parents may borrow up to the cost of education, minus any financial aid received, for each dependent undergraduate student. The interest rate is fixed. Repayment on principle and interest begins when the loan is disbursed, however deferment options are available.

Maryland State Scholarship Program

The Maryland Higher Education Commission offers several need-based scholarships and grants for Maryland residents. The scholarships and grants most frequently awarded to Hood students include, but are not limited to, the Educational Assistance Grant, the Guaranteed Access Grant, Senatorial Scholarship and Delegate Scholarship. In order to be considered for a Maryland State Scholarship, a student must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 1. Some state scholarships may have additional application requirements. Please check with the Maryland Higher Education Commission-Student Financial Assistance at 800-974-0203 or www.mhec.state.md.us.

Veterans’ Educational Benefits

Hood College serves as a liaison/informational resource to veterans by providing Veterans Administration forms and certifying military students for benefits. To initiate or continue benefits, veterans must contact the Registrar’s Office, 301-696-3616, at the beginning of each semester to complete the required paperwork, in compliance with the policies and procedures established by the registrar and the Veterans Administration. Information and application forms may be obtained from the Registrar’s Office located on the second floor of the Joseph Henry Apple Academic Resource Center.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements for Financial Aid (SAP)

Process Overview and Responsibilities 

In accordance with the U.S. Department of Education, the Office of Financial Aid at Hood College monitors undergraduate and graduate students after the spring semester each academic year for successful completion of satisfactory academic progress (SAP) standards. For financial aid eligibility, terms are defined as fall, spring and summer. All students are measured on qualitative (grade-based) and quantitative (time-based) standards. Students who fail to meet SAP standards are not eligible for any financial aid unless an appeal is granted. Students who fail to meet SAP standards can only appeal one time and change their major one time. 

Programs affected by not meeting SAP standards include: Federal Pell Grant, Federal Direct Loans (Subsidized and Unsubsidized), Federal Plus Loans, Federal SEOG, Federal Work Study, state grants and scholarships, and institutional scholarships.

Qualitative Standards (Grade-based)

Qualitative standards measure a student’s quality of performance in terms of GPA, including basic skills courses (reading, writing, mathematics). 

Each semester a student must meet the following cumulative GPA standard:

Total Hours Attempted 

 Minimum GPA Requirement

 1-25

1.50 GPA 

 26-38

1.60 GPA 

 39-50

1.70 GPA 

 51-63

1.90 GPA 

 64-124

2.00 GPA 

In order to graduate, a student must have a minimum GPA of 2.0. If a student fails to meet the above GPA requirements, he/she will be suspended from financial aid but will have the opportunity to submit an appeal. 

Quantitative Standards (time-based also referred to as PACE)

In order to maintain financial aid eligibility, the U.S. Department of Education requires a student to successfully complete 67% of the credits for which he/she attempted as shown in the example below:

Hood College Office of Financial Aid calculates the pace at which you are progressing in your SAP academic plan by dividing the cumulative number of credits you have successfully completed by the cumulative number of credits you have attempted. All periods of enrollment count when assessing quantitative standards, even periods in which the student did not receive financial aid. 

Pace=Cumulative number of credits that you have successfully completed

  Cumulative number of credits that you have attempted

Unsatisfactory grades of F, INC, AU, F, S and U do not count as completed courses but will count as attempted credits. In addition, repeated coursework is counted as attempted hours for financial aid eligibility. Students can only receive financial aid for a passed course one additional time. If the student registers for a previously passed course the third time, the course is ineligible for financial aid. Students are eligible up to 30 attempted hours for basic skills courses (reading, writing, mathematics) which are not counted in the quantitative standards. If a student exceeds 30 attempted hours without successful completion, the student becomes ineligible for financial aid and must pay for those courses prior to continuing at Hood College. 

Transfer credits that count toward the student’s current program count as attempted and completed for financial aid eligibility. 

Quantitative Standards (maximum timeframe)

Students must be making progress toward a degree. To quantify academic progress, Hood College must set a maximum timeframe in which you are expected to finish a program. A student must complete his/her program of study within 150% of the length of the program. If a student needs additional time to complete the degree, the student may submit an appeal for financial aid. Students at Hood College are expected to complete 124 credit hours to earn an undergraduate degree. Students are eligible to receive financial aid up to 186 attempted hours at Hood College (not including 30 credit hours for basic skills courses). If additional time is needed, students can submit an appeal to the Director of Financial Aid.


Financial Aid Suspension

Students are placed on financial aid suspension if they do not meet one or both of the SAP standards.  Hood College monitors SAP annually at the end of spring semester and students are notified accordingly.  Students are not given a warning period since the process is monitored once per academic year.  Students have the option to appeal for financial aid once they are on suspension.  

Appeals Process

Students on financial aid suspension may appeal in writing to the Director of Financial Aid.  Appeals must be submitted by July 1 in order to review for the upcoming fall semester.  Students must provide in writing the extenuating circumstance(s) why SAP was not made and submit any supporting documentation.  The student must state how the situation has changed and what action will be taken in order to meet SAP standards at the next evaluation period (end of spring semester).  If the appeal is for maximum timeframe, the Director of Financial Aid may request the student to submit an academic plan signed by his/her advisor.  The Director of Financial Aid will notify the student if such documentation is needed for the appeal. 

The Director of Financial Aid will review the appeal and notify the student in writing within ten business days of the decision.  All decisions made by the Director of Financial Aid are final. 

If the appeal is granted, students will be placed on financial aid probation for one semester and are expected to improve their SAP status by the end of the semester probation is granted.  If, at that time, the student does not meet SAP standards, the student will be suspended from financial aid with no opportunity to appeal.  If the student is successful, the student will be removed from probation and placed in good standing for financial aid eligibility.  In order to be successful, the student must meet cumulative GPA standards and maintain a 67% cumulative passing rate.  If the student is placed on academic plan and is following the plan, the student shall remain on probation until program completion and will be eligible for financial aid.

Merit Scholarships

Hood College has developed an extensive merit scholarship program that recognizes outstanding achievement and/or demonstrated talent and accomplishment in leadership, research, community service or writing. Students admitted to Hood are considered for merit scholarships at the time of admission. Some scholarships, however, are awarded through an interview process involving our Faculty Scholarship Committee.

Each year, Hood College awards more than $5 million in merit-based scholarships. Merit-based scholarships range from $2,000 to full-tuition.

From time to time, an individual student-applicant may qualify for consideration in more than one scholarship category. In such a case, the highest scholarship amount will take precedence in Hood’s awarding process. All are limited up to eight semesters.

Students are notified of yearly renewal criteria, including minimum grade point average, upon receipt of their financial aid award letter.

  • Hodson Trust Academic Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time first-year students who have the highest academic profiles and have shown leadership in school and community activities. A separate application and interview are required.
  • Hodson -Gilliam Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time first-year students from ethnic backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in higher education. Applicants must have demonstrated high academic achievement. A separate application and interview are required.
  • Presidential Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time first-year students with exceptional academic and extracurricular leadership.
  • Trustee Scholarship— awarded to incoming full-time first-year students with demonstrated academic ability and leadership in school and community activities.
  • Dean’s Scholarship —awarded to incoming first-year students with strong records of academic performance and extracurricular involvement. These students show the potential to contribute to classroom activities and the Hood College community.
  • Achievement Award —awarded to incoming full-time first-year students with demonstrated financial need who have the potential to succeed academically and have demonstrated leadership, commitment to community service and/or demonstrated talent.
  • Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time transfer students who are Phi Theta Kappa members and have earned an A.A. or A.S. degree. Must be a Phi Theta Kappa member at the time of admission.
  • Joseph Henry Apple Transfer Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time transfer students who have demonstrated academic achievement.
  • Martha E. Church Transfer Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time transfer students who have demonstrated academic achievement..
  • Henry Irvin Stahr Transfer Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time transfer students who have demonstrated academic achievement..
  • Andrew G. Truxal Transfer Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time transfer students who have demonstrated academic achievement..
  • Randle Elliot Transfer Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time transfer students who have demonstrated academic achievement.
  • Shirley D. Peterson Transfer Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time transfer students who have demonstrated academic achievement.
  • Ross Prichard PTK Merit Transfer Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time transfer students who have demonstrated academic achievement.
  • Hood Heritage Scholarship —awarded to full-time, first year, traditional-age, undergraduate students who are children or grandchildren of a Hood alumna or alumnus. 
  • Legacy Scholarship —awarded to full-time, first year and first time transfer students whose parents earned a graduate degree from Hood College. 
  • Alumnae Scholarship —awarded to incoming full-time first-year students or transfer students who are referred to admission by a Hood College alumnae or alumni.

Scholarships and Awards

Endowed scholarships, annual scholarships, prizes and awards are awarded according to the criteria of each scholarship, prize and award.

Endowed Undergraduate Scholarships

The Allegheny Power Scholarship

The Carol Lumb Allen ’59 and Caroline Finkenbinder Lumb ’30 Scholarship

The Martha Shortiss Allen ’59 Scholarship Fund

The W.A. Lantz and the Bertha McCall, Class of 1906, Alumnae Scholarship

The Marycatherine Anthony ’74 Scholarship

The Marguerite L. and William G. Baker Scholarship Fund*

The Alice McCusker Barnard ’23 Scholarship

The Mary Hendershot Bastian ’50 Scholarship

The Mariana Main Beachley ’36 Scholarship

The Sue and Ross Benitez Scholarship

The Mary Louise Hester Bennett ’30 and Elizabeth Bennett Wiegand ’60 Scholarship Fund

The Nettie C. Bentley ’28 Music Scholarship

The Muriel Binder ’33 and Mildred K. Binder ’40 Scholarship

The Christine Moyer Bloom ’22 Scholarship

The Board of Associates 50th Anniversary Endowed Fund for Student Scholarships

The Betty Bruce Borgerding ’35 Scholarship Fund

The Frances Good Crilly Bowers ’27 Music Scholarship Fund

The Olive L. Bowlin ’19 Endowed Scholarship

The William H. Browning, Jr. Community Scholarship

The Chug Scholarship

The Martha E. Church H’95 Scholarship Fund for International Students

The Walter and Eleanor Church Endowed Scholarship*

The Rhea Robinson Claggett ’36 and Mariamne Claggett Vickery ’80 Scholarship

The Class of 1932 Scholarship

The Class of 1948 Endowed Scholarship

The Class of 1962 Endowed Scholarship

The Class of 1967 Memorial Scholarship

The Class of 1969 Scholarship*

The Class of 1976 Endowed Scholarship

The Class of 1977 Scholarship

The Class of 1978 Scholarship

The Class of 1979 Scholarship

The Class of 1980 Scholarship

The Class of 1982 Scholarship

The Class of 1984 Endowed Scholarship

The Class of 1985 Scholarship

The M. Virginia Coblentz ’33 Scholarship

The Edison H. and Daphne B. Cramer Scholarship

The Virginia M. Crist Scholarship

The Katharine E. Cutshall ’24 Scholarship

The Laura and Theodore Deforest Scholarship Fund

The Delaplaine Foundation Inc. Scholarship Fund

The Judge Edward S. Delaplaine Scholarship

The Robert E. and Ruth M. Delaplaine Scholarship

The William T. and Janie Quynn Delaplaine Scholarship

The Dona Ditty Memorial Scholarship

The J. William and Sarah Thomas Drenning ’49 Scholarship*

The Nancy Hill Drew ’58 Scholarship*

The Dyer Work Award

The Elfin-Kawecki Scholarship Fund*

The F. Virginia Ellis ’39 Scholarship Fund

The Helen Kirk Deputy Ellis ’27 and Mary Ellen Deputy Fowler ’33 Foreign Language Scholarship Fund

The Esselen Family Scholarship Fund

The Evangelical and Reformed Church Scholarships

The Sally Conrad Fauntleroy Scholarship (In Expression)

The Karen Louise Fisher ’77 Scholarship

The Stella Elizabeth Ziegler Foley ’28 Scholarship Fund

The Jennifer Frantz ’97 Scholarship Fund

The Frederick Female Seminary Scholarship

The Margaret R. Geiser Memorial Scholarship Fund

The General Endowed Scholarship

The Giles Scholarship

The M. Fredrica Godshalk, M.D. ’65 Scholarship Fund*

The Griesemer Scholarship

The Gloria M. Grossnickle Scholarship Fund

The Ann Coulter Hancock ’40 Scholarship Fund

The Julia Etchison Hanna ’19 Scholarship

The Anne Keet Hanson ’34 Scholarship

The Virginia Shaver Harshman ’41 Scholarship Fund

The William Randolph Hearst Endowed Scholarship

The Lizzie S. Heckle Scholarship

The Albert & Ethel Herzstein Charitable Foundation Scholarship*

The Carol Schulthess Hires ’68 Scholarship

The Hodson Foundation Scholarship

The Hodson Trust Academic Scholarship

The Hodson-Gilliam Scholarship

The Nettie McCardell Hoffmeier Scholarship

The H.G. and Lula K. Hoke Scholarship

The Arlene Utz Hollinger ’37 Scholarship

The Carolyn Tillou Holran ’60 Scholarship

The Hood College Fathers’ Club Scholarship

The J. Harold Hooper Scholarship

The Sharon I. Hooper ’58 Scholarship

The Nancy Hoskins Houston ’51 Scholarship

The Richard Hudnut Scholarship

The Josephine Thompson Hunger ’40 Scholarship

The Huttle Scholarship

The Janice R. Hylen ’78 Memorial Scholarship

The Dorothy Richardson Jones ’31 Scholarship Fund

The Dean Mary Frear Keeler Scholarship

The Miriam W. Kelly ’34 Scholarship

The Joan Kempthorne ’54 Scholarship

The Carrie M. Kerschner Memorial Scholarship

The Kurbyweit Scholarship*

The John N. Land Scholarship Fund

The Elizabeth Ruth Langert ’38 Scholarship

The Louis A. Langie Jr. and Sally Weaver Langie ’51 Scholarship

The Latrobe-Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania Scholarship

The Charles A. and Helen Titzel Lauffer Scholarship

The Lillian Zeigler Lavetan ’18 Scholarships

The Adele Edmunds Levering ’14 Scholarship

The Frederick Weir Levering Scholarship

The Margaret Loudon Lewis Scholarship

The Bert S. and Mary H. Lewis Memorial Scholarship

The Charles J. Little Scholarship

The Arthur H. Long, Sr. and Lois Long Harley ’45 Family Scholarship

The Lonza Bioscience Scholarship

The Janet B. Loudon Scholarship Fund

The Mary and Daniel Loughran Scholarship

The Lowe-Bitler Scholarship

The Evelyn Barrick Mahoney ’34 Scholarship

The William Markow Music Scholarship Fund at Hood College

The Esther Taylor Marshall ’35 Scholarship Fund

The Timothy S. May Scholarship

The Susan McAlpine ’47 and Margaret McAlpine ’46 Scholarship

The William A. McCarty, Jr. and Elinor F. Herndon McCarty ’60 Scholarship

The McCullagh McCutcheon Scholarship Fund

The McCurdy Scholarship

The Paul F. Mehl Memorial Scholarship

The John D. Meyer Scholarship

The Nettie Morton Miller Scholarship*

The Lorie Harris Morrell ’84 Scholarship

The Morrow Scholarship Endowment

The Margaret J. and John C. Motter Scholarship

The Mullison Scholarship Fund

The Kathleen A. and Charles F. Murphy Scholarship

The Margaret S. Neely Hood Scholarship

The Wayne C. Neely Hood Scholarship

The Eleanor MacMillan Nelson ’32 Scholarship

The Elisabeth Farber Neubauer ’45 Scholarship

The New York Times Scholarship

The Kathryn Zimmerman Nicodemus H’05 Music Scholarship

The Stephanie Lundy Normann ’56 Scholarship

The Ines M. Oertel ’96 and Carsten Oertel Scholarship*

The J. Edward and Jessie Spielman Omwake Scholarship

The George W. and Edith Osmun ’18 Scholarship

The J. Elyse Pade ’54 Scholarship

The Elizabeth Walton Paiste ’32 and Ethel Hobson Auf Der Heyde ’32 Scholarship Fund

The Audrey Field Parrott Endowment for the Language Arts*

The Benjamine Cawley Parrott Endowment for the Sciences*

The Nancy Freeman Patterson ’53 Scholarship Fund

The Elizabeth Peters - Barbara Michaels Scholarship Fund

The Shirley D. Peterson Scholarship Fund

The Beryl Pfizer ’49 Scholarship Fund for Theatre Minors

The Margaret Jones Pollack ’49 Scholarship

The Sylvia F. Porter H’58 Scholarship

The Octavia M. Power ’30 Endowed Scholarship

The Dorothy E. Pugh ’58 Scholarship

The James B. Ranck Memorial Scholarship

The Nora Roberts Foundation Scholarship

The Andy Rooney Scholarship in Writing*

The Harry A. Rosenfeld Scholarship

The Charlotte Snyder Rupner ’18 Scholarship

The Margaret Russell ’42 Scholarship

The Gretchen Howe Russo ’63 Scholarship*

The Patricia Feiser Sanner ’38 Science Scholarship Fund

The Myrtle Annis Scott Scholarship

The Kimberly Ann Servedio ’99 Memorial Scholarship

The Elizabeth Ann Seton Education Scholarship

The Helen Burton Shelton ’40 Scholarship

The Lori A. G. Shipley ’97 Endowed Scholarship Fund*

The Alfred P. and Patricia A. Shockley Scholarship

The Alice Smith ’33 Scholarship

The M.E. Smith Scholarship

The Ruth Yost Snyder ’36 and Lehman J. Snyder Scholarship

The Dr. and Mrs. Alexander Solosko Scholarship

The John G. and Beulah Munshower Sommer ’44 Computer Scholarship

The William H. Sprigg Applied Music Scholarship

The Henry I. Stahr Scholarship

The Glenna May and John Hedges Staley Scholarship

The Eleanor C. Stanley and Kenneth N. Stanley Scholarship Fund

The Frances Steckel Music Scholarship

The Virginia Geddert Stone ’40 Scholarship

The Louise Kling Tefft ’37 Scholarship Fund*

The Helen Kelly Terwilliger ’27 and Edith M. Kelly Terwilliger Scholarship

The Clyde E. and Julia E. Thomas ’14 Scholarship

The G. Frank Thomas Foundation Scholarship

The Mr. and Mrs. Jacob L. Thomas and Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Mullen Scholarship

The Dr. William H. Thomas and Bradley Barrick Thomas ’41 Scholarship

The Andrew G. Truxal Scholarship in Sociology Fund

The Van Wert Scholarship Fund*

The Mr. and Mrs. William H. Vanderford Scholarship

The L. Marie VanHise ’49 Scholarship

The Pearl Walker ’32 Scholarship in Mathematics

The Oliver C. and Carrie E. Warehime and the Alexander D. and Dorothy Warehime Lewis ’17 Scholarship

The Louise A. Weagly ’30 Scholarship Fund

The Wehler Family Scholarship

The Aldan T. Weinberg Scholarship Fund*

The Sarah Patton Weinberger ’32 Scholarship

The Philip and Janis Miller Wertheimer ’29 Scholarship Fund

The Dr. Olivia G. White Scholarship Fund*

The Olive Wagner Wilt ’26 Memorial Scholarship

The Women’s Guild Scholarship

The Nora E. Yost ’17 Scholarship

The W. Meredith and Helen Brown Young ’35 Scholarship

* Not currently available for award

Annual Undergraduate Scholarships

The Achievement Fund

The H.K. Alwine Scholarship

The Barnes & Noble Textbook Scholarship

The Roscoe G. Bartlett Scientific Scholarship Fund

The Audrey Pressler Bauman ’43 Scholarship Fund*

The Dr. Regena C. Beck ’17 Scholarship                                          

The Board of Associates Leadership Fund

The Alden E. and Harriet K. Fisher Scholarship

The Bernard Gerrard Fund for "Mature" Students at Hood College*

The Ardine and Phyllis Gorden Applied Music Scholarship

The Hood College Ring Scholarship

The Roy Jorgensen Associates, Inc. Annual Scholarship

The Dorothy Rost Kretzer ’53 Scholarship

The Hilda C. Landers Scholarship

The Loats Foundation Scholarships

The McCardell Family Scholarship Fund

The Charles and Kathryn Nicodemus Annual Scholarship Fund

The Presidential Leadership Scholarships

The Vincent and Alice Riordan Scholarship

The Nora Roberts Foundation Scholarship in Nursing

The Fred Schenkel Scholarship Fund

The George L. Shields Foundation, Inc. Scholarship for Nursing

The F. Lawrence and Shirley J. Silbernagel Scholarship

The Hood College Waltersdorf Henson Scholarship

The Ruth Whitaker Holmes ’55 and Portia Whitaker Shumaker ’55 Science Scholarship

The Raymond R. and Margaret M. Zimmerman ’22 Music Scholarship

* Not currently available for award

Undergraduate Prizes and Awards

The Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs Leadership Award

The Leah B. Allen Award in Astronomy

The American Institute of Chemists Foundation Award

The Elizabeth Yourtee Anderson ’82 History Prize

The Art Club of Frederick Prize

The Art Department Alumnae Award

The Art Department Faculty Award

The Beta Beta Beta Award

The Biology Faculty Award

The Blue and Grey Editorial Award

The James R. Boston Prize

The Elizabeth B. Bower Prize

The Dr. Martha M. Briney ’35, H’78 Honor Scholarship

The Bromer Peace Prize

The Grace N. Brown ’25 Prize in Mathematics

The Patricia Bucheimer Piano Prize

The Dana Cable Community Service Award in Psychology

The Larry T. Campbell Memorial Prize

The Julia Holzapfel Carhart ’30 Prizes in Mathematics

The Catherine Filene Shouse Career Center and Office of Service Learning Distinguished Intern Award

The Chemistry Achievement Award

The Martha E. Church H’95 Prize for Leadership and Service

The Class of 1988 Volunteer Behind the Scenes Award

The Janice E. Cole Scholarship

The Janice E. Cole Writing Prize

The Computer Science Undergraduate Achievement Award

The Computer Science Faculty Prize

The Computer Science Chair’s Fund Prize

The Frances C. Cutujian Prize

The Joseph E. Dahms Community Service Award

The Emily Myers Davis ’43 Prize

The Department of Chemistry and Physics Faculty Award

The Department of Economics and Business Administration Book Prize

The Department of Economics and Business Administration Leadership Prize

The Department of Foreign Languages & Literatures Award

The Johanna Chait Essex ’53 Prize in Early Childhood Education

The Exceptional Achievement Award in Psychology

The Margaret P. Ford Honor Scholarship

The Elaine Adrienne Gates Memorial Prize in Studio Art

The German Embassy Prize

The Raymond L. and Louise K. Gillard Prize

The Godman Prize in French*

The Ardine and Phyllis Gorden Music Scholar Prize

The Ardine and Phyllis Gorden Musical Talent Prize

The Suzanne Gottert ’68 Prize in Art

The Dr. Ruth Esther Griffith Biology Award

The Edenia Guillermo Award

The Shirley Conner Hardinge ’44 Prize

The Maureen Kelly Hess ’81 Prize

The Hood College Choir Award

The Hood College Retailing Club Prize

The C. May Hudson Prize

The Francis G. Hugo Prize in Psychology

The Hypatia Mathematics/Science Education Prize

The Dr. Robert Kaufmann German Prize

The Mary Ann Kerins Humanitarian Award

The George G. Kleinspehn Honor Scholarship

The Margaret Louise Kleist Prize

The Dr. Henry P. and M. Page Laughlin Administrative Achievement Award

The Dr. Henry P. and M. Page Laughlin Faculty Professional Achievement Award

The Dr. Henry P. and M. Page Laughlin Student Award

The Law and Society Prize

The E. Louise Leonard Prize

The Virginia E. Lewis Best Paper Award

The Virginia E. Lewis Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Political Science

The Logic Prize

The Marion MacPhail Prize

The Marie A. Markow Excellence in Music Prize

The Maryland Section of the American Chemical Society Prize

The Jane D. McCarrell Prize

The Helen McCullagh McCutcheon ’14 Prize

The Charlotte A. Moran ’57 Prize

The Music Department Special Award in Applied Music

The Wayne C. Neely Prize

The John and Janet Nunn ’61 French Prize

The Vesta Hoffman Osler ’30 Chemistry Award

The Outstanding Arabic Student Award

The Outstanding Intermediate Arabic Award

The Outstanding Research Contribution Award in Psychology

The Park-Dorff Award

The Florence A. Pastore Memorial Prize

The George C. Pearson Prize

The Phi Alpha Theta Award in History

The Pi Mu Epsilon Book Prize

The Hildegarde Pilgram ’31 Book Prize

The James B. Ranck Book Prize in American History

The George E. Randall Award for Excellence in Journalism

The Mary Ellen Randolph Prize

The Anna Louise Remsen ’33 Prize in Art

The Mary Margaret Rose Award

The Rouse Graduate Scholarship

The Linda Scott Outstanding Mentorship Award in Psychology

The SGA Student Leader of the Year Award

The Esther E. Shaw Award

The Sidney Silverman Award

The Linda Mae Snapp Memorial Award in Nursing

The William Sprigg Prize

The Margaret Condron Sterner ’39 Scholarship

The Charles E. Tressler Distinguished Teacher Award

The Charles E. Tressler Outstanding Student Award

The Alyce T. Weinberg Honor Scholarship

The Adrianne Wells ’04 Social Work Student of the Year Award

The White Blazer Award

The Elizabeth Leiby Wood ’38 Prize

The Linda Wyatt ’68 and Marleen Spriggs ’69 Award in African American Studies

*Not currently available for award

Lecture and Performance Funds

The Dana G. Cable Memorial Thanatology Lecture Series Fund

The Homer W. Carhart H’07 Guest Pianist Fund

The Ceramic Arts Visiting Artist Fund

The James M. Etchison Summer Chamber Music Trust

The Ardine and Phyllis Gorden Concert Fund

The William J. and Wilma M. Haines Lecture Fund in Biomedi­cal Ethics at Hood College

The Hanson Lecture Series

The Hood College Management Lecture Series Fund

The Jean Royer Kohr ’62 Memorial Lectureship

The Miss Grace Lippy Endowed Science Lecture Fund

The Charlotte Moran ’57 Foreign Language Visiting Scholar and Lecturer Fund

The Pade Lectureship and Perfor­mance Fund

The Randall Family Endowed Chamber Music Concert Series Fund

The Nora Roberts Foundation Writer-in-Residence Program

The Silverman Young Artists Concert Fund

The Hadley Tremaine Lecture Fund

Research and Support Funds

The Barrett Advertising Child Development Center Scholarship Fund

The Martha E. Church H’95 Center for Leadership and Service Endowed Fund

The Class of 1957 Endowment

The Class of 1983 Child Develop­ment Lab Fund

The Class of 1986 Endowed Fund

The Class of 1987 Endowed Fund

The Class of 1991 Film Series

The Computer Science Enhance­ment Fund

The Gale Heather Demarest Class of 1962 Low Interest Loan Fund

The Anne Derbes Art Outreach Fund*

The Nancy Salzman Ebert ’57 Education Technical Learning Laboratory

The First Generation Student Center

The Shirley Conner Hardinge ’44 Center for Global Studies

The Hodson Faculty Fellowships

The Hoffberger Endowed Honors Program

The Huntsinger Art History Travel Fund

The E. Louise Leonard Language Lab Fund

The McCardell Professional De­velopment Grants Endowed Fund

The McHenry Chaplain Fund

The Miller Greenhouse Endowment

The Grace Lampe Morrison ’25 Endowment

The National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge

The Betsy Radey Pancelli ’49 Memorial Research Fund

The Beryl Pfizer ’49 Endowed Theatre Production and Program­ming Fund

The Onica Prall Child Develop­ment Lab School 75th Anniversary Fund

The Second Century Foundation Student Grants

The John M. Stadlbauer Chemis­try Department Instrument Fund

The Summer Research Institute Grants

The Tambor Bay School Fund

The Tidball Center Endowment Fund

The Tischer Endowed Funds

The Williams Observatory Fund

The Phebe Zimmerman Endow­ment Fund

* Not currently available for award

Chairs and Professorships

The Beneficial Chair in Economics

The Giles Chair in Early Child­hood Education

The Hodson Trust Professorship in Nursing

The KBE Head Tennis Coach Fund*

The Mildred Brown Lefferts Endowed Chair Fund

The Virginia E. Lewis Chair in Political Science

The Sophia M. Libman National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Professorship

The McHenry Dean of the Chapel

The Eleanor S. Pearson Professor Fund

The Hildegarde Pilgram Chair in History

The Andrew G. Truxal Chair of Economics and Sociology

The Whitaker Chair in Chemistry

* Not currently available for award

Reduced Tuition Opportunities

Hood offers several opportunities for reduced tuition, including programs for older citizens and Hood alumnae and alumni.

Encore Program

The Encore Program enables Hood alumnae and alumni who hold a B.A. or B.S. from Hood to take undergraduate courses at one-half tuition.

Family Tuition Plan

When two or more members of the same family are enrolled at Hood College, the Family Tuition Plan provides an annual grant of $2,000 (to be divided equally between the fall and spring semesters) to the second member of the family.  A family is defined as a parent, dependent child and/or dependent child’s sibling.  Under the Family Tuition Plan, both members of the family must be enrolled as full-time traditional undergraduate students.

All students admitted under the Family Tuition Plan must meet the regular admissions standards of the College, as appropriate.  The Family Tuition Plan applies to tuition only and does not apply to the board or other fees.

Renewal Not Retirement

Hood’s Renewal Not Retirement (RNR) program offers persons 60 years of age or older the opportunity to audit undergraduate courses. Studio and lab courses, practicums and self-directed study courses are not available for audit.

Undergraduate Special Academic Opportunities

Center for Computer Security and Information Assurance

The Center for Computer Security and Information Assurance, housed within the Department of Computer Science, coordinates and promotes inter-disciplinary research, education, and service projects in computer security and information assurance. Center activities bring together faculty, students, researchers, government and industry computer security experts, and law enforcement practitioners to share information and develop new ways to protect users, information systems, and information infrastructures. The Center currently offers a graduate Certificate in Information Security. The Center’s web site is located at: ccsia.hood.edu.

Coastal Studies Semester

See Coastal Studies Semester for more information.

Departmental Honors Paper

The Departmental Honors Paper is a senior-year program designed for students who wish to pursue intensive research or special projects in close coordination with faculty advisers. The course number 499 designates this type of study. Students writing Departmental Honors Papers are designated Christine P. Tischer Scholars.

See About Course Offerings for more information.

First-Year Living-Learning Communities

First-Year Living-Learning Communities are designed to provide first-year students with a common living and learning experience within their fields of interest. Students in the program will be housed together by community in the residence halls and will be required to attend monthly activities and events related to the themes, to participate in student-created programs and service projects, and to write papers reflecting on their learning experiences. In addition, students will be required to enroll in at least one of the designated courses within their communities each semester.

First-Year Seminar Program

Because an ability to communicate well on a college level is crucial to success at Hood, this pilot program offers first-year students an opportunity to sharpen reading, writing, and presentation skills in a small classroom setting.

All first-year seminars are reading and writing intensive and will help students refine their skills in critical thinking, information literacy, class discussion, and group work. Each seminar is limited to 15 students in order to allow class members to work closely with their professor and fellow students. The seminar topics are designed to have broad appeal while reflecting the varied interests and expertise of the faculty who teach them.

The first-year seminar can replace one category of second tier Methods of Inquiry (except for lab science) in the core requirements. No first-year seminar will count toward a major.

Military Science/ROTC

Hood College offers the U.S. Army Reserve Officers’ Training Program (ROTC) in association with the Military Science Department of McDaniel College. See Course Offerings for more information.

Study Abroad Programs

Hood students may study abroad in approved programs in virtually every part of the world. The College requires language majors to study abroad unless they reside for two years in one of the language houses.

Language students ordinarily enroll in programs abroad that offer instruction in the local language. Hood has formal associations with several established overseas programs, including those offered by The American University in Cairo (Egypt), Sweet Briar College (Paris), Dickinson College (Toulouse), University of Seville, University of Alicante, Seoul Women’s University and the University of Mainz, among others.

Students may also study abroad in short-term summer programs: Social Work Field Experience in Ireland (co-sponsored by Hood College and Frostburg State University) and the Bahrom International Program in Seoul, Korea.

All students intending overseas study should make application at least one semester in advance of the proposed study. Students should consult with the Hood College Study Abroad Coordinator as soon as they determine they wish to study abroad.

The College encourages students to study abroad during the junior year. Some sophomores study abroad because of compelling program or personal reasons, and in rare instances the College permits seniors to study abroad in the fall semester.

The Hood College Honors Program

A limited number of academically exceptional students are accepted into the Hood College Honors Program. Combining classroom instruction and co-curricular activities, the Honors Program offers a challenging academic experience and encourages both independent and collaborative learning. The program requirements are discussed in Majors and Courses of Study.

Off-Campus Programs and Courses

PLEN

Hood College is an associate member of The Public Leadership Education Network. PLEN offers exciting programs that allow Hood students to gain firsthand experience shaping public policy in communities, the nation and the world. Students who enroll in PLEN’s Women and Public Policy Internship Program learn about policy, research or social advocacy by working alongside women leaders in the Congress, courts, executive agencies and nongovernmental advocacy groups. Students may earn from 3 to 15 Hood College credits for participation in PLEN’s internship programs. Those who wish to complete a PLEN internship must also meet Hood’s requirements for internship eligibility. PLEN also offers three-day to three-week seminars on topics such as Women and Congress; Women in Science and Technology; Women and International Policy; and Women, Law and Public Policy.

For more information about any of PLEN’s programs, contact the Career Center.

Washington Semester Program

Hood College cooperates with American University’s Washington Semester Program, an arrangement that provides priority access to Hood students who join 300 to 400 other students from across the country. Students may enroll in any of the units of the program: American National Politics Semester, Foreign Policy Semester, Justice Semester, Public Law Semester, Economic Policy Semester, Peace and Conflict Resolution Semester, Journalism Semester, Museum Studies and the Arts Semester, International Business and Trade Semester and International Environment and Development Semester. The director and academic advisers of each unit help students plan their programs, includiFng a seminar, an independent research project and either an internship or a course at American University. Entrance requirements include a Grade Point Average of 2.5, second-semester sophomore status, a recommendation from the Hood faculty adviser to the program and selection by the director at American University. Credits (but not quality points) are transferable to Hood. Because financial arrangements for room, board and tuition differ from those at Hood, students are urged to consult with the Hood financial aid officer well in advance. Hood students need not file a petition with the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies to participate in the Washington Semester.

Community College Exchange

Full-time Hood students may take one course each semester at Carroll Community College (CCC) or Hagerstown Community College (HCC) without charge, provided that the course chosen is not offered at Hood during the academic year. See Academic Policies for more information on this program.

Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Degrees

Hood offers three undergraduate degrees: the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science and the Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Candidates for these degrees must complete requirements as outlined below. It is the responsibility of the student to be sure that all degree and major requirements are fulfilled by graduation.

General Requirements

  • Demonstration of the ability to write and speak standard English (included in the grade evaluation for every course at Hood College).
  • Compliance with all general regulations of the College and of the Student Government Association.

Graduation Requirements

  • Completion of at least 124 credits in courses numbered 100 or above.
  • Achievement of a 2.0 cumulative Grade Point Average.
  • Enrollment in the final 30 credits on the Hood campus as a degree candidate.
  • Completion of the College Core Curriculum.
  • Completion of all major requirements. 

Major Requirements

  • A 2.0 cumulative Grade Point Average in courses in the major discipline must be maintained.
  • A minimum of 12 credits of course work in the major discipline must be completed at Hood.
  • A minimum of 15 credits of course work in the major discipline must be completed at the 300-level or above. 

The Second Degree

Students who wish to earn any two degrees (B.A. and B.S.) concurrently must accumulate 154 semester hours of credit and fulfill Core Curriculum requirements for both degrees and the requirements for both majors.

Students already holding a bachelor’s degree who wish to earn a second bachelor’s degree, must accumulate at least 30 credits as a degree candidate at Hood and meet all degree and major requirements. Some departments require more than two semesters of full-time enrollment. determination of how many credits must be earned at Hood for the second degree is made by the registrar, based on evaluation of the transcript from the original degree-granting institution.

A second bachelor’s degree is offered through the Encore Program to Hood alumnae and alumni who hold a B.A. or B.S. from Hood. (This program is not available to alumnae and alumni who have only attended Hood’s Graduate School.) The same provisions apply as above, but at one-half tuition. Hood graduates apply for reinstatement as degree candidates through the Registrar’s Office.

Undergraduate Academic Policies

Appeals to academic policy may be made to the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies. Petition forms are available in the Office of the Registrar.

Academic Honor Code

All Hood undergraduates affirm on each class assignment that they “have neither given nor received any unauthorized aid.” Cheating or plagiarism—any unacknowledged use of another person’s language or ideas—is thus both an affront to the general standards of conduct on which an intellectual community depends and a specific violation of the Honor Code. As such, these offenses are treated seriously and may lead to severe disciplinary action, including dismissal from the College. For a full description of the policies and procedures of the Honor Code, contact the dean of students.

Students wishing advice on the proper use and acknowledgement of scholarly materials should consult their individual instructors, the library staff and any of the several reliable guides to scholarly writing that these sources may recommend.

Copyright Statement

Hood College affirms the obligation of its faculty, staff, and students to comply with all Federal copyright laws (Title 17, United States Code). Copyright law gives copyright holders (writers, publishers, artists, etc.) exclusive rights to distribute, copy, perform, or publicly display, their own original works. The College recognizes its obligation to promote the rights and responsibilities granted under this law. Hood College assumes that any questions regarding copyright, as they apply to materials for instructional or other College use, will be resolved prior to the use of those materials on College-owned equipment or in College-sanctioned activities.

As members of an institution with an established Honor System emphasizing intellectual integrity, the Hood College community should recognize their responsibility to follow the law and to model it for others. All members of the College community are responsible for complying with College guidelines regarding the legal use of copyrighted materials, regardless of their format or the purpose for which they are used, and for complying with the requirements of copyright law, including obtaining required permissions to use copyrighted materials. Members of the Hood community who willfully disregard copyright law do so at their own risk and assume any liability, which may include criminal, and/or civil penalties. In addition, disciplinary action may be taken as outlined a) for students, in the Bylaws of the Student Government Association (Judicial System), b) for faculty, in the Faculty Code (Termination or Sanctions for Cause), and c) for staff, in the Staff Handbook (Section 405.3).

Peer-to-Peer File Sharing

Uploading or downloading works protected by copyright without the permission of the copyright owner is an infringement of the copyright owner’s exclusive rights of reproduction and/or distribution. Anyone found to have infringed a copyrighted work may be liable for statutory damages up to $30,000 for each work infringed and, if willful infringement is proven, liability may be increased up to $150,000 for each work infringed. An infringer of a work may also be liable for the attorney’s fees incurred by the copyright owner to enforce his or her rights. The files distributed over peer-to-peer networks are primarily copyrighted works, and there is a risk of liability for downloading material from these networks. There are currently many “authorized” services on the Internet that allow consumers to purchase copyrighted works online, whether they be music, e-books, or motion pictures. By purchasing works through authorized services, consumers can avoid the risks of infringement liability.

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act

The DMCA is a response to concerns regarding the pirating and distribution of digital materials, and it helps to clarify how copyright relates to those materials. The DMCA criminalizes the development of technologies intended to circumvent devices (such as passwords or encryption) that limit access to copyrighted material, and it also criminalizes the act of circumvention itself. Institutions of higher education that act as Internet Service Providers (such as Hood College) are granted limited liability for copyright infringement involving the use of their networks if they take steps to designate a local agent to receive notices regarding instances of infringement over the local network and for effecting a “take-down” of the infringing material. The Library Director will provide contact information for Hood’s Take-Down Officer.

Academic Honors

Commencement Honors

Commencement Honors are awarded to graduating seniors who have achieved the following composite average at the time of graduation (see The Hood College Grade Point Average and The Composite Average located under Grades):

  • Summa Cum Laude: 3.95–4.00
  • Magna Cum Laude: 3.85–3.94
  • Cum Laude: 3.70–3.84

Convocation Honors

Convocation Honors are awarded to current sophomores, juniors or seniors who achieved a 3.6 or above G.P.A. for the preceding year. The College bases this G.P.A. on at least 12 semester hours of Hood work (or approved study away) on letter-grade basis. Students who have outstanding incomplete grades for the year are not eligible.

Dean’s List

The Dean’s List recognizes degree-seeking students who completed at least 6 semester hours of Hood work (or who have received permission to study abroad or away for a semester) and achieved a 3.5 or above semester G.P.A. Students who have outstanding incomplete grades for the semester are not eligible.

Hood College Scholar

Hood College Scholars are named at the beginning of the junior or senior year, is the student who received Convocation Honors for at least two consecutive years (may include approved study away). A student who has graduated from the College is not eligible to become a Hood College Scholar.

Academic Standing and Classification

Classification

  • Freshman: fewer than 25 credits earned.
  • Sophomore: 25-55 credits earned.
  • Junior: 56-86 credits earned.
  • Senior: 87 or more credits earned.

Academic Standing

Students are in good academic standing when both the semester and cumulative Grade Point Averages are at least 2.0. Hood makes every effort to assist students to maintain this academic standard. It is the student’s responsibility to take advantage of the College’s academic, health and psychological counseling services as a means of overcoming problems impeding progress.

At the end of each semester, the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies considers the records of those students who have earned a semester or cumulative average below 2.00, and examines the records of students previously placed on academic warning or probation. Academic action by the Committee is based not only on the academic record, but includes input from the offices of Residence Life, Disability Services, Student Affairs and the student’s instructors and adviser, regarding issues such as attendance and completion of assigned coursework, and issues from outside the classroom that may have affected a student’s academic success. Based on all the information, students will be placed on academic warning, academic probation, required leave of absence or be dismissed from the College.

Academic Warning

A student will be placed on academic warning if his or her semester Grade Point Average (G.P.A.) falls below 2.0.

Academic Probation

A student will be placed on academic probation if his or her cumulative Grade Point Average (G.P.A.) falls below 2.0. Academic probation means that a student is in danger of being dismissed from the College for academic reasons. Students on academic probation must make satisfactory progress the following semester or risk being dismissed.

Students on academic probation may not register for more than 14 credits or 4 courses without permission from the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies.

Students who are placed on Academic Probation will be required to sign a copy of the probation letter, indicating they have agreed to assume responsibility for their academic status by attending classes regularly, completing assignments on time, using course, mathematics and composition tutoring services and/or doing whatever is appropriate to resolve their specific academic problems.

Academic Dismissal

The College, upon recommendation of the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies, may at any time dismiss a student who is experiencing academic difficulty. This policy applies to all students. Although all cases are decided individually, the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies will use the following guidelines when reviewing academic records:

1. Students whose cumulative Grade Point Averages (G.P.A.) fall below the following levels will be dismissed: 


Total Semester Hours Attempted* Minimum Cumulative Hood G.P.A.
Less than 30 credits 1.75
30 or more credits 2.00
*Credits attempted include all transfer credits accepted by Hood. However, grade point averages listed in this table are based on Hood work only.

2. Students with three consecutive semester averages below 2.0 will be dismissed.

3. The College reserves the right to dismiss at any time any students who fail to meet minimal standards of academic responsibility or who are deemed to be a detriment to themselves or to others, as determined by the vice presidents of academic affairs or student life. Such grounds for dismissal could include but are not limited to ceasing to attend classes, disrupting the life and work of the College community or completing any semester with a term grade point average below 1.0. This policy applies to all students, including first–semester first-year students.


4. Students who are dismissed from the College may not enroll in classes as a nondegree-seeking student.

Exceptions:

  1. Students with more than two consecutive semesters on probation may be permitted to remain at the College only if the student has earned a G.P.A. above 2.0 in the most recent regular (fall or spring) semester and in the opinion of the Academic Standards and Policies Committee is making satisfactory progress toward the completion of degree requirements.

  2. The Committee on Academic Standards and Policies Committee may make exceptions to the above-mentioned guidelines based on input about unique circumstances from the Offices of Residence Life, The Josephine Steiner Center for Academic Achievement and Retention, Disability Services, Student Affairs and/or the student’s instructors and adviser.

Appeal for exemption from dismissal may be granted by the provost and dean of the faculty in unusual circumstances and following consultation with the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies, the student’s instructors and adviser and other relevant offices. Appeals for reinstatement must be received two weeks prior to the first day of classes. Students whose appeals are granted will be readmitted to the College for one semester on a provisional basis. Failure to comply with the conditions specified in the letter allowing them to return to the College will result in their dismissal at the end of the provisional semester, if their minimum G.P.A. for retention is not attained.

Dismissal and Reinstatement

Students who are dismissed for academic reasons may petition for reinstatement after completing a minimum of one full-time semester at another accredited institution and receiving no grade below a C.

The following is the procedure for possible reinstatement:

  • The student writes to the registrar to request permission to return to Hood.
  • The student provides transcripts of work attempted elsewhere or other pertinent information.
  • The Committee on Academic Standards and Policies reviews the request and makes a decision regarding reinstatement.

A student who is reinstated will be placed on academic probation. Reinstatement does not automatically reinstate financial aid. The student must notify the Office of Financial Aid.

If a student is dismissed for nonacademic reasons, the student must request in writing to the dean of students permission to return to Hood. The dean of students decides if the student may be reinstated.

Financial Aid Implications

Financial aid recipients are required to be in good academic standing and maintain satisfactory academic progress toward degree requirements. Please refer to the financial aid section of the catalog for financial implications.

Attendance and Absence

The College does not set a maximum number of absences permissible in any course. Individual faculty members have the prerogative to establish a maximum number of absences at the beginning of the semester, and are encouraged to include a written statement of their attendance policy on the course syllabus. Students accept full responsibility for seeing that work does not suffer from excessive absence.

The College recognizes that there are other justifiable reasons for class absence: observance of religious holidays or participation as a representative of the College in athletic contests or cultural performances. Such absences are acceptable only if previous absences are not excessive and if the student has made arrangements with the instructor, prior to the day of the absence, for the work missed.

Limits/Restrictions:

  • Students must attend the first class meeting of each of their courses or notify the instructor or the Registrar’s Office of their absence, or risk being withdrawn from the class with a grade of WX.
  • Enrollment in a course constitutes an informal contract with the instructor, and a student who violates an instructor’s attendance policy risks dismissal from the course. Instructors may have a student withdrawn from a class and a grade of WX recorded up until the deadline for course withdrawal. After the course withdrawal deadline has passed, the student receives a grade of F.
  • A student who is dismissed from a course for excessive absences or who is withdrawn from the class for failing to appear at the first class meeting may be reinstated only by the joint consent of the course instructor and the registrar.
  • Classes are held up to the date and hour preceding vacations and they resume promptly after the recess in accordance with the academic calendar. Students are expected to attend classes meeting just prior to and immediately following holiday periods.
  • Students are fully responsible for making up work missed due to class absence. When students are absent, they are responsible for obtaining lecture notes from reliable sources. Assignments and projects are to be delivered to the instructor on the assigned date, even when the student does not attend class. All exams are to be taken at the scheduled time. Having another exam scheduled on the same day is not considered sufficient justification for rescheduling the exam.

The College requires instructors to inform the director of The Josephine Steiner Center for Academic Achievement and Retention of students who demonstrate erratic attendance patterns. This is not done to penalize the student but rather to ensure that College officials can assist students in making consistent progress toward the degree.

Audit

With instructor permission, a student may enroll in most lecture courses as an auditor. As the term implies, auditors listen rather than engage in class discussions and projects. Auditors attend class regularly but do not write papers or take exams or quizzes.

 Limits/Restrictions:

  • The student receives neither credit, grade nor grade points for an audit; however, the audit does appear on the transcript.
  • There is no limit on the number of courses that a student may audit during a semester. If the audited course or courses cause a student to exceed 18.5 credits, the excess credits will be billed by the undergraduate per-credit-hour fee.
  • It is not possible to audit courses such as creative writing, painting, drawing, labs and other courses where the nature of the activity requires the participation of the student. Students may enroll on a noncredit basis in such courses by paying the current per-credit-hour fee.
  • No changes to or from the audit option may be made after the end of drop/add period.
  • A student may take for credit, at a later time, a course that was previously audited.
  • Part-time students pay a reduced audit fee to audit a course See Undergraduate Tuition and Financial Aid, Costs.

Credit for Prior Learning

Hood awards credit for prior learning through Advanced Placement exams, CLEP and DANTES exams, departmental challenge exams, portfolio work, International Baccalaureate, military training and noncollegiate programs approved by the American Council on Education. These alternative modes of learning are evaluated separately from transcripts of traditional transfer credit from other accredited schools.

Limits/Restrictions:

  • Credit for prior learning is awarded only to students admitted as degree candidates.
  • A maximum of 30 hours of credit may be earned through any combination of prior learning credits and Hood courses elected on the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.
  • Students may not receive credit by examination for any course that they have previously audited, failed, received credit or from which they have withdrawn.
  • Credit through examination or portfolio may not be attempted during the final 15 hours of credit.
  • Credit through examination or portfolio may not count in the minimum of 30 Hood credits required for the degree.
  • The requirement of 12 credits of coursework at Hood in the major cannot be fulfilled by portfolio credit or through credit by examination.

Advanced Placement

Unless otherwise noted, Hood College awards credit upon receipt of the official AP Grade Report for AP scores of 4 or 5 for the following tests:

Art:

Art History, 3 credits for ART 220 and exemption for ART 221

Studio Art, 3 credits for ARTS 101 or ARTS 123 (score of 3 is acceptable). The Department of Art and Archaeology will determine for which course credit will be awarded after portfolio review.

Biology:

Biology, 4 credits for BIOL 110-139 with a score of 4 or 5

Chemistry:

Chemistry, 4 credits for CHEM 101 with a score of 4; 8 credits for CHEM 101 and CHEM 102 with a score of 5.

Computer Science :

Computer Science Test A, 3 credits for CS 201

Computer Science Test AB, 3 credits for CS 202

Economics:

Macroeconomics, 3 credits for ECON 205

Microeconomics, 3 credits for ECON 206

English:

English Language/Composition, 3 credits for ENGL 101

English Literature/Composition, 3 credits for ENGL 221

Environmental Science and Policy :

Environmental Science, 3 credits for ENSP 101 for score of 5

Foreign Languages:

Chinese Language and Culture, 3 credits, No Hood equivalency

French Language and Culture, 3 credits, No Hood equivalency

German Language and Culture, 3 credits, No Hood equivalency

Italian Language and Culture, 3 credits, No Hood equivalency

Japanese Language and Culture, 3 credits, No Hood equivalency

Latin, 3 credits, No Hood equivalency

Spanish Language and Culture, 3 credits, No Hood equivalency

Geography:

Human Geography, 3 credits for GEOG 101

History:

European History, 3 credits, no Hood equivalent

United States History, 3 credits each for HIST 217, HIST 218

World History, 3 credits each for HIST 262, HIST 263

Mathematics:

Calculus AB, 3 credits for MATH 201

Calculus BC, 3 credits each for MATH 201, MATH 202

Calculus BC/AB Subscore of 4 or 5, 3 credits for MATH 201

Statistics, 3 credits for MATH 112

Music:

Music Theory, 3 credits for MUSC 101

Physics:

Physics B, 4 credits for PHYS 101 with score of 4; 4 credits each for PHYS 101, PHYS 102 with score of 5

Physics C-Mechanics, 4 credits for PHYS 203 with score of 4

Physics C-Electricity/Magnetism, 4 credits for PHYS 204 with score of 4

Political Science :

Comparative Government, 3 credits for PSCI 210

United States Government, 3 credits for PSCI 203

Psychology:

Psychology, 3 credits for PSY 101

CLEP

Unless otherwise noted, Hood College awards credit for scores of 50 on the following CLEP examinations:

Biology:

Biology, 4 credits for BIOL 110-139 for score of 52

Business Administration:

Principles of Management, 3 credits for MGMT 205

Principles of Accounting, 6 credits for MGMT 281, MGMT 284

Economics:

Principles of Macroeconomics, 3 credits for ECON 205

Principles of Microeconomics, 3 credits for ECON 206

Education:

Human Growth and Development, 3 credits for EDUC 223 for score of 52. Students who transfer credit for a similar human growth and development course must take the departmental test to qualify for courses for which EDUC 223 is a prerequisite. No additional credit is earned for this test.

English:

American Literature, 3 credits for ENGL 223

English Literature, 3 credits for ENGL 222

History:

History of the United States I, 3 credits for HIST 217

History of the United States II, 3 credits for HIST 218

Mathematics:

Calculus, 6 credits. No Hood equivalency

Precalculus, 3 credits for MATH 120

Political Science:

American Government, 3 credits for PSCI 203

Psychology:

Human Growth and Development, 3 credits for PSY 237

Introductory Psychology, 3 credits for PSY 101

Sociology:

Introductory Sociology, 3 credits for SOC 101 with a score of 52

DANTES

Hood awards credit for the following DANTES examinations:

Geography 101

History - No Hood course equivalency

History 234

Mathematics 112

Religion - No Hood course equivalency

Departmental Examinations

$195 per test for Hood students; administered through The Josephine Steiner Center for Academic Achievement and Retention 301-696-3569.

Departmental examinations may not be repeated. Credit is awarded for grades of A, B or C on the following departmental examinations:

CHEM 101 – 3 lecture credits; may be used to fulfill Non-laboratory area of the Core

CHEM 102 – 3 lecture credits; may be used to fulfill Non-laboratory area of the Core

IT 180 – 3 credits

MATH 120 – 3 credits

MATH 201 – 3 credits if Level III has been earned on the BSI

MATH 202 –3 credits (test available only to students who have earned credit for or completed MATH 201)

MATH 207 – 3 credits if Level III has been earned on the BSI

MATH 253 – 3 credits

MUSC 103 – 3 elective credits

PHIL 207 – 3 credits

PE 225, 226 – 3 credits each

PHYS 101, PHYS 102 –3 lecture credits each; may be used to fulfill Non-laboratory area of the Core

PHYS 203, PHYS 204 –3 lecture credits each; may be used to fulfill Non-laboratory area of the Core

Foreign Language Placement Examinations:

Additional credit in French, German, Latin and Spanish is awarded at the end of the first semester with grades of A, B or C earned for the following placements:

3 credits – Placement in and completion of a 103-level course during first semester at Hood ; no credit for students awarded credit for AP/Foreign Language

6 credits – Placement in and completion of 203, 204 or civilization course during first semester at Hood; 3 credits for students awarded credit for AP/Foreign Language

9 credits – Placement in and completion of 207 or a 300-level course during first semester at Hood ; 6 credits for students awarded credit for AP/Foreign Language

Students are exempt from the Foreign Language Core requirement if placed by exam, but choose not to enroll, in a 103 or above foreign language course. No credit is earned.

International Baccalaureate

Credit is awarded only upon receipt of the official IB transcript. Students who have received an IB diploma, with a score of 30 or higher and with no score less than 4 in any one of the six examination groups, may be awarded up to 30 credits toward an undergraduate degree at Hood College. Students who have not completed the full IB diploma will receive 6-8 credits for Higher Level examination results of 5, 6 or 7.

Portfolio Advantage Program

Hood College awards credit for alternative modes of learning. Students who have acquired college-level learning through life experiences and other noncollegiate activities may want to explore Hood’s Portfolio Advantage Program. This program enables a degree-seeking student to earn credit for prior learning through work and/or volunteer experience equivalent to college-level courses. Students should do so only if the learning cannot be assessed through standardized or departmental measures.

At Hood, the portfolio is an organized presentation of a student’s past experiences that identifies and documents specific skills that the student has learned, mastered and applied to be successful. Once the written portfolio is completed, the document is reviewed and evaluated by a member of the faculty who will determine if what the student has written is equivalent to what is taught in class. It is the portfolio that enables a professor to evaluate work and volunteer experience and to grant credit for relevant learning beyond the classroom.

To participate in Hood’s Portfolio Advantage Program:

  • Once admitted as a degree-seeking student, students must register for at least 3 credits before they can begin the Portfolio program. Three credits of coursework must be earned before portfolio credits are awarded.
  • Degree candidates interested in the Portfolio Advantage Program are required to work with the Writing Skills Coordinator in the Center for Academic Achievement and Retention (CAAR). The fee for this program is $935.
  • The complete portfolio must be submitted within one year of beginning the program.
  • Portfolio credit may be awarded only if the learning is appropriate to Hood’s general education requirements, electives and/or specific programs. Based on the quality of writing and construction of the portfolio and the content, credit will be awarded for work equivalent to a grade of C or better.

Military Experience

Hood recognizes the unique nature of the military lifestyle and has committed itself to easing the transfer of relevant course credits and crediting learning from appropriate military training and experiences. Students need to provide a copy of their DD214 and/or ACE/AARTS transcripts. One credit in physical education is awarded for military basic training. First aid certification will receive elective credit for PE 214.

Double-Numbered Courses and Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses

Certain courses have been designated as appropriate for both graduate students and undergraduates. These double-numbered courses are identified by numbers in both the 400 and 500 range. Undergraduate students enroll in a double-numbered course at the 400-level and receive undergraduate credit. Graduate students enroll at the 500-level and receive graduate credit.

Undergraduate students must meet different performance standards from the graduate students. These differences may relate to the quality and/or quantity of work required, and may also involve measures of grading.

To be eligible to take a 400/500-level course, undergraduate students must have a cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.0 or better and have earned at least 56 credits, including 12 credits or more at the 200 level or above in the course discipline.

To be eligible to take a 500-level graduate course and receive u n dergraduate credit, Hood undergraduate students must have earned senior status (87 credits) including 12 credits or more at the 200 level or above in the course discipline; have a cumulative Grade Point Average of 3.0 or better; have a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or better in the major area of study; and complete a petition, verified by the registrar and approved by the Graduate School, the adviser and the instructor. Credit will count only toward the undergraduate degree.

To be eligible to take a 500-level graduate course and receive gra d uate credit, Hood undergraduate students must have earned a minimum of 109 credits and meet the requirements indicated above. Credit will not apply toward the 124 credits required for the undergraduate degree.

Final Examinations

Instructors give final examinations in all courses except those in which special assignments are more appropriate. Instructors inform students of final examination policy at the beginning of the term. Final exam dates are listed in the official Academic Calendar, and students’ travel plans must take the dates of scheduled exams into account. No student may reschedule a final examination in order to leave or travel early. In accordance with the Hood College Honor Code, the student may not discuss any final examination in any way with anyone during the final examination period. Final examinations may not be given prior to the start of the designated examination period.

Financial Obligations

Grades, transcripts, future registrations and diplomas will be withheld until the student has paid all tuition, fees and other bills incurred at the College, and has returned all library books.

Grades

Grading Criteria

Hood’s faculty uses the following general criteria in determining grades. Demonstration of the ability to write and speak standard English is included in the grade evaluation of every course. The criteria upon which students will be evaluated is included on every course syllabus.

A, A- (90–100) indicates general excellence; the student displays initiative, independence and often originality in the course.

B+, B, B- (80–89) indicates an unquestioned grasp of the subject’s fundamental facts and principles, an understanding of their significance and an ability to use them effectively; work is logically organized and technically correct; the student often shows initiative and independent work.

C+, C, C- (70–79) indicates the student has a fairly accurate knowledge of the subject’s fundamental facts and principles and is able to apply them reasonably well; work is fairly logical in organization and technique but it is incomplete; there is evidence of growth in handling the coursework.

D+, D, D- (60–69) indicates work is of inferior quality yet deserving of credit; there is some acquaintance with basic facts and principles but work is poorly organized and technically faulty; the student frequently fails to complete assignments.

F (0–59) indicates work shows no grasp of basic facts and principles and is not deserving of credit; it is poorly organized and technically faulty; the student frequently fails to complete assignments.

S indicates satisfactory completion of work done on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis; performance is at a C- level or better.

U indicates unsatisfactory completion of work done on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis and not deserving of credit; performance is at a D+ level or lower.

INC indicates incomplete work in a course because of illness or serious emergency beyond the student’s control; students must arrange to finish assignments in accordance with the College’s incomplete grade policy.

Grade Appeal

Grade appeals of the final course grade must be filed in a timely manner. Students must contact the faculty member involved no later than the end of the first week of the semester following the filing of the disputed grade. If the issue is not satisfactorily resolved, the department chair must be contacted within 30 days of the beginning of the semester. Appeals to the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies must be initiated by the last day prior to midsemester recess of the semester following the filing of the disputed grade. A Final Grade Appeal, available in the Registrar’s Office, must be completed and submitted with all required documents before the Committee considers the petition. A delay in the filing of a grade appeal constitutes sufficient reason for denial of the appeal by the Committee.

The Committee on Academic Standards and Policies will screen out frivolous or unsubstantiated appeals and will consider legitimate appeals that fall into the following categories:

  • Miscalculation of a grade; or,
  • Assignment of a grade to a particular student by application of more exacting requirements than were applied to other students in the same course.
  • Assignment of a grade on some basis other than performance in the course.

All parties to the grade appeal (student, instructor, chairperson, registrar, committee members) are to maintain strict confidentiality until the matter is resolved.

Grade Changes

Instructors have the right to change a grade if they have made an error in computing or recording a student’s grade. Instructors must notify the Registrar’s Office in writing of the error within three weeks after the grades have been issued. Grade changes due to a computational or recording error discovered after the deadline, and requests for grade changes for any other reasons, must be submitted by the instructor in writing to the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies.

Midterm Low Grades

Students who earn a low grade at mid-semester (C-, D+, D, D-, F, U or INC) receive a notice of low grade(s). The low grade report does not become a part of the student’s permanent record, but is, instead, an indication of the need for corrective action.

Final Grades

Hood releases final grades electronically to the student and the student’s adviser through Self-Service. Final and midterm grades will be forwarded to parents/guardians of first-year students who have signed a release form sent to them the summer before they enter Hood.

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Grade Plan

Hood provides an alternate grade plan as a means of encouraging intellectual curiosity. Under the satisfactory/unsatisfactory option, students receive a grade of “S” and credit for work of “C-” caliber or better or a grade of “U” and no credit for work of “D+” or lower quality. Neither grade is computed in the cumulative grade point average.

Limits/Restrictions:

  • Students may not choose the S/U option for any course used to satisfy the Core, in the major field, the minor field or an independent study. If a course is only offered for S/U credit, this policy does not apply.
  • Students may choose the S/U option for a maximum of 12 satisfactory/unsatisfactory credits within the total 124 credits Hood requires for graduation. Students spending three years at Hood may choose the S/U option for only 9 satisfactory/unsatisfactory credits to meet graduation requirements; two years, 6 credits; one year, 3 credits. Courses only offered for S/U credit are not counted in these totals.
  • At registration, students indicate their intent to take a course on the satisfactory/unsatisfactory plan on the course and schedule card. Change from one grading plan to another must have the adviser’s approval and must occur before the end of the drop/add period. No changes to or from the satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading system may be made after the drop/add period.
  • Students are cautioned that some graduate and professional schools and employers look negatively at satisfactory/unsatisfactory on transcripts because actual performance or mastery of the subject has not been demonstrated.

Grade Point Averages (GPA)

The average that appears on all transcripts and grade reports is the average of all grades earned at Hood. Accepted transfer credit is included in the earned credit total and is applied toward the 124-credit degree requirement, but the quality hours and quality points earned at another institution are not calculated in the Hood average. Foreign language majors and students par­ticipating in a Hood-sponsored, affiliated or approved semester or year abroad program at the University of Seville or the Dominican Republic programs may earn quality points for work accomplished with a passing letter grade

Each grade received at Hood on the A-F grading scale has a corresponding grade point: A=4.00; A-=3.67; B+=3.33; B=3.00; B-=2.67; C+=2.33; C=2.00; C-=1.67; D+=1.33; D=1.00; D-=0.67 and F=0.00.

Grades with no quality points include: AU, S, U, INC, Z, TR, W

By computing the quality points received for each letter grade, students can ascertain their average or grade point average. For example, a grade of “C” in a 3-credit course earns 6 qual­ity points. Add the number of quality points earned in each course to learn the quality point total. Divide the quality point total by the total number of credits (in courses which have letter grades) and the result is the Grade Point Average (G.P.A.).

The Composite Grade Point Average

The composite Grade Point Average is the average of all college work attempted. All grades earned at Hood and those completed at other institutions are calculated, regardless of whether the course credit was accepted for transfer. The composite average is used to determine eligibility for various honor societies as well as determining Commencement honors.

The Major Average

An academic department may refuse to accept as a major a student whose G.P.A. falls under 2.0 in the discipline. The department may require a student who has declared a major to drop the major if the student’s G.P.A. falls below 2.0.

Graduation and Commencement Participation

Graduation

In the spring of the junior year, the registrar sends rising seniors who plan to graduate in the following year a graduation audit form indicating their progress toward fulfilling degree requirements. This audit begins the graduation clearance process that continues through the senior year. Students should meet with their faculty advisers to review degree requirements and to plan their senior year registrations. At the beginning of the fall semester, seniors complete the Application for Graduation. Bachelor degrees are awarded in January, May and September.

Commencement Participation

Students who have completed all degree requirements by the date grades are due for the second semester may participate in the May commencement.

Students graduating in January participate in the May commencement ceremony. Students completing degree requirements in September participate in the May ceremony the following year.

Students may not participate in commencement unless all degree requirements and all financial obligations to the College have been met.

Incomplete Grade Policy

When serious illness or emergency prevents a student from completing the work for a course, instructors may allow additional time to finish assignments. Incompletes are not substitutes for failure to attend classes or to complete assigned work.

Limits/Restrictions:

  1. The student must file an application for an incomplete grade with the Registrar’s Office no later than the last day of classes.

  2. An incomplete may not be granted unless a student has completed at least half the work of the course.

  3. The student’s progress in the course must be passing (D- or above) at the time the incomplete is requested.

  4. The registrar must approve a notation of incomplete and record an INC on the student’s permanent record. After the instructor assigns a grade, an “I” remains permanently on the record with the final grade earned beside it.

  5. The date agreed upon for completion of all assignments may not be later than March 15 for fall semester and October 15 for spring or summer semester. Any request for extension of an incomplete grade must be submitted by the student to the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies.

  6. Work not completed by the deadlines stated above will convert to a grade of zero unless an extension is approved by the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies.

  7. Students who register for a subsequent semester with more than three credits of incomplete outstanding will have their schedules reviewed and their enrollment registration potentially restricted by the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies. As a result of this review, the Committee may limit the course load that a student is permitted to undertake in the subsequent semester.

Internship Program

Requirements for 3- to 9-credit Internship

  • Enrollment at Hood as a degree candidate (nondegree or non-matriculated students are ineligible for internships).
  • A minimum 2.0 cumulative G.P.A. and 2.5 G.P.A. in the internship discipline.
  • Completion of a minimum of 45 college-level credits prior to the beginning of the internship.
  • Completion of at least 9 credits or three courses at the 200 level or above at Hood in the internship discipline. (See additional department requirements.)

Requirements for 12- to 15-credit Internship

  • Enrollment at Hood as a degree candidate (nondegree or non-matriculated students are ineligible for internships).
  • A minimum 2.0 cumulative G.P.A. and 2.5 G.P.A. in the internship discipline.
  • Completion of 75 college-level credits prior to the beginning of the internship.
  • Students may enroll for 15 credits during the spring or fall only. Students may enroll for a maximum of 12 credits of internship during the summer and 3 credits in the January term. The number of credits available also varies by department.

Note: Students may take a maximum of 15 internship credits throughout their academic career.

Applying for an Internship

Students considering an internship should visit the Career Center to explore internship options and pick up appropriate paperwork, including a Learning Agreement to be signed by the faculty internship adviser and the on-site supervisor.

Internship Responsibilities

All parties have specific responsibilities for ensuring the integrity and success of the internship experience. Please refer to the Internship Handbook available on the Career Center website (www.hood.edu/careercenter) for additional details.

Supplemental Expenses and Time

In fulfilling the expectations of the internship, the intern may incur expenses in addition to the usual tuition and fees. Students who enroll in an internship must plan to provide their own transportation or use public transportation.

Due to the time requirements of an internship, students may need to work during breaks and holidays. Campus housing is available when the College is not in session.

Placement is not Guaranteed

Interns are not placed in sites and it is the student’s responsibility to find a site. The Career Center and departmental offices provide many resources to the student to assist in locating a suitable internship

Termination of Internship

Under unusual circumstances, any party involved in the internship may terminate the agreement. Because the internship is essentially a professional commitment, Hood strongly encourages students to fulfill their obligations to complete the full term of service at the site. Unfortunately, on rare occasions, the intern or the faculty internship adviser may determine that the internship site is not an appropriate learning experience, or the internship site may determine that the intern is not a good fit for their internship. In either case, any of the parties may decide to terminate the internship. If this occurs, notify the Career Center immediately. Please note: If an internship is terminated for any reason, the student is responsible for following all procedures regarding adding/dropping credits and is responsible for all tuition, fees and penalties associated with credit coursework. Please refer to the Internship Handbook available on the Career Center website (www.hood.edu/careercenter) for additional details.

Time Requirements

A student must work a minimum of 40 hours at the internship site for each credit earned.

Leave of Absence

Students who need to be away from the College for one or two semesters, but who wish to maintain ties to the College and to resume their studies at a later time, may take a leave of absence instead of withdrawing. Students who do not return from a leave of absence after two semesters will be withdrawn. Students may not request a leave of absence for the remainder of the currently enrolled semester without the written permission of the dean of students. Leave of absence forms are available in the Office of the Registrar.

Students do not file a leave of absence form in order to study abroad or at another institution in the U.S. Instead, they must file a petition with the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies for approval for study elsewhere.

Emergency Leave of Absence (ELOA)

A student may be granted an Emergency Leave of Absence (ELOA) for a period not to exceed two consecutive weeks within an academic semester. A request for an emergency leave of absence must be supported with appropriate documentation which is required before the leave is approved. Requests for an emergency leave of absence will be reviewed and approved by the Dean of Students and communicated to the Registrar’s Office for a specified period of time.

An emergency leave of absence applies to students who must be absent for mental or physical health reasons, military commitments, international travel/documentation or any other personal or family emergency.

Students who require an emergency leave of absence beyond the two week period will be withdrawn from the semester. Failure to attend classes by the return date specified on the emergency leave of absence form will result in an automatic administrative withdrawal from the College.

Students are asked to consult with appropriate offices/personnel in processing an emergency leave of absence. Such consultations may include conversations with the Financial Aid Office, Residence Life Office, Office of Multicultural Affairs and International Student Programs, Dining Services, ROTC, and the academic adviser.

An Emergency Leave of Absence (ELOA) Form may only be obtained from the Dean of Students Office.

Registration, Drop/Add and Course Withdrawal

Advising and registration for degree candidates occurs in April for the fall semester and November for the spring semester. Matriculated students are required to meet with their advisers to select courses and review degree progress. The adviser authorizes the student for registration and, on the day indicated on the Academic Calendar, the student registers for classes via Self-Service.

Cancellation of Courses

A fall or spring semester course is subject to cancellation when fewer than eight students are enrolled. Summer and January term classes are subject to cancellation when fewer than five students are enrolled.

The College reserves the right to cancel the course as late as the first day of classes each semester. Every effort will be made to work with students regarding program planning and placement in alternate courses that would be compatible with the cancelled course.

Course Schedules

A credit hour usually represents one hour of class work and at least two to three hours of preparation in a given subject per week throughout the semester.

Classes usually meet on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday, Monday-Friday afternoon or a Tuesday-Thursday schedule. Except for lab sessions, 3-credit Monday-Wednesday-Friday classes generally convene for 50 minutes and Tuesday-Thursday classes for 75 minutes. Four-credit classes meet for a total of 200 minutes per week. Most evening classes meet once a week for 2-1/2 hours or twice a week for 75-minute periods. 

Hood also has blocked courses, which are courses that meet for double periods during a portion of the semester. Blocked courses are primarily studio art and education courses in the teaching internship semester.

Course Repeat Policy

A student may repeat a course under the following circumstances:

  • Failure (F, U) in the course previously.
  • Enrollment in a course on a credit basis after previously auditing the course.
  • Course description states that a course may be repeated (e.g., MATH 335).
  • Grade of “C-” or below has been initially earned in a 100- or 200-level course. Course may be repeated once.
  • Failure to meet minimum grade required in a prerequisite course.
  • All grades earned for a given course will remain on the academic record and be computed in the Grade Point Average. Credit will be awarded only once.
  • Students may not repeat a course at Hood for which transfer credit has been awarded.

Course Load Full-time and Part-time Status

Full-time status requires 12 credit hours or more per semester. A typical semester program consists of 15 or 16 credits except in the first year when it may be 12-15 credits.

Part-time status is accorded students taking 11.5 credit hours or fewer per semester.

Students are normally limited to 12 credits completed during the summer. Exceptions to this credit limit require permission of the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies. Students may complete a maximum of three credits during the January session.

Limits/Restrictions:

  • Enrollment in more than 18.5 credits in one semester requires a 3.0 cumulative average and permission from the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies. Enrollment in credits beyond 18.5 requires additional tuition for each hour or fraction above that number.
  • A student may not enroll in two courses which meet at the same hour.

Drop/Add Period

Students may drop or add courses without academic penalty from the time of registration through the end of the drop/add period. See the Academic Calendar for dates.

During this period students may also change to or from the SU (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) grading option (see below), change to or from enrollment on an audit basis, or alter the number of credits in courses carrying variable credit.

Course Withdrawal After Drop/Add

If a student withdraws from a course after the end of the drop/add period and before the end of the eleventh week of the semester a W (indicating withdrawal) will be noted on the transcript. This notation will not be computed in a student’s grade point average.

A student may not withdraw from a class during the last four weeks of classes.

Self-directed Study and Teaching Assistantships

Hood defines self-directed study as: 1) regular and X-credit independent study; and 2) internships, field work and other courses similar to internships in that they do not have a classroom component.

  • Students may take a maximum of 27 credits (excluding an honors paper) in self-directed study in the total 124-credit program. A combination of internships and independent study must not exceed 15 credits of internship or 12 credits of independent study.
  • Students may take a maximum of 18 credits (excluding an honors paper) in self-directed study in the major program. A combination of internships and independent study must not exceed 15 credits of internship, 12 credits of independent study or more than 1/4 of the major program (whichever is less).
  • Students may not add independent study credits to internships to fill a complete semester program. An exception to this rule is independent study that students take at the Washington Center for Learning Alternatives or through a similarly structured program.
  • Independent study topics may not duplicate any course offered during the period of the student’s enrollment at Hood.
  • Independent studies are granted to nondegree students under only exceptional circumstances.

Teaching Assistantships

Many departments offer students the opportunity to serve as teaching assistants, for which academic credit is awarded. Serving as a teaching assistant affords a student the opportunity to understand the materials of a course or of a laboratory from the perspective of the teacher. The course number 335 designates this type of study.

Limits/Restrictions:

  • A total of 4 credits of Teaching Assistantship may be counted toward the degree. The course may be taken for 1-3 credits and may be repeated at the discretion of the department. Departments have the right to limit the number of credits granted per semester and may or may not allow students to repeat the course.
  • As a general guideline, a student should work at least three hours per week for each credit granted in the assistantship. Grading is on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

Student Information, Records and Transcripts

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 (P.L. 93-380) extends to students the right of access to their education records maintained at the College. The provost, the dean of the Graduate School, and the registrar maintain these records for enrolled and former students. Information and notification as to the type of record; the accessibility of and policies for maintaining, reviewing and expunging the record; and the procedures for inspecting, reviewing, obtaining copies of or challenging the record are established by the appropriate offices.

Student Rights and Public Information

In accordance with College policy and FERPA, the following items are considered Directory Information and will be released in response to any inquiry, unless the student notifies the registrar in writing that she/he does not wish this information released: class level, major, dates of attendance, name and dates of attendance at other institutions, degrees and dates awarded.



Transcripts

No transcript will be released if the student has not satisfied all financial obligations to the College.

Hood College has authorized the National Student Clearinghouse to provide transcript ordering. This service provides 24 hour access, seven days a week; secure transactions; secure electronic transcript delivery worldwide; on-demand order tracking and updates emailed to the student; enables additional documents to be delivered with the transcript; and the ability to order multiple transcripts for multiple recipients in one order.
Current students may place transcript requests through Self-Service. Alumnae and former students may access the Clearinghouse through www.getmytranscript.com.

Normal requests are processed within 3-5 working days upon receipt of request. Rush transcripts are processed in 24 hours of the next working day at a charge.

Transfer Policy and Attending Other Institutions

Transfer Policy

The registrar evaluates prior college coursework and credit earned through alternative methods for applicability to degree requirements at Hood College. Credit is generally awarded for courses that are clearly applicable to a baccalaureate degree and for which the student earned a grade of C- or above. Courses that are clearly vocation or occupational in nature will not be accepted as credit towards the baccalaureate degree. A maximum of 62 credits may be awarded for freshman/sophomore level work completed elsewhere. Although there is no limit for junior/senior level coursework, students will be awarded no more than a total of 94 credits for all college-level work completed.

The transferability of credits from an institution that is not accredited by a regional accreditation agency may be considered upon receipt of documentation that demonstrates equivalency regarding course information, equivalencies and learning outcomes. It is the student’s responsibility to provide this documentation.

The final 30 hours of the degree must be taken on the Hood campus (see Undergraduate Degree Requirements ). In addition, the College requires transfer students to take a minimum of 12 credits of classroom instruction in the major discipline at Hood, regardless of the number accepted in transfer. Transfer students must submit their transcripts to the registrar prior to enrollment. All transfer documents must be filed within the first semester of enrollment. The registrar may refuse to award credit if students fail to meet this deadline.

All grades earned at Hood and those completed at other institutions are calculated in the composite grade point average, regardless of whether the course credit was accepted for transfer. The composite average is used to determine eligibility for various honor societies as well as determining Commencement honors.

Degree Students Attending Other Institutions

Students may receive credit for coursework completed with a grade of C- or above at another accredited institution during the academic year or the summer with prior approval of the department and the registrar. Students must petition to take a course from another college during any semester or session. The course may not be offered at Hood during that semester/session. Petitions are available in the Registrar’s Office. The maximum number of credits that can be taken during the summer is one credit more than the number of weeks in the session for a maximum of 12 credits. Students may enroll for up to 4 credits during a three-week January term.

Community College Exchange

Full-time Hood students may take one course each semester at Carroll Community College (CCC) or Hagerstown Community College (HCC) without charge, provided that the course chosen is not offered at Hood during the academic year. CCC also offers the exchange to Hood students during their summer sessions. To register, students obtain the consent of their advisers and the Hood registrar. The registrar will provide a statement of enrollment for registration at CCC or HCC.

Withdrawal from the College

A student may withdraw from the College at any time during the semester. See Tuition and Financial Aid for refund information. If the withdrawal occurs after the drop/add period, a grade of W will be recorded for each course.

Reinstatement after Withdrawal

Students in good academic standing at the time of withdrawal and with no holds on future registration are eligible for reinstatement to the College. Reinstatement requests must be sent to the Registrar, indicating: the year and semester of return; if the student will return as a full or part-time student and as a resident or commuter. Students will be readmitted with the major active at the time of withdrawal.

Undergraduate Majors, Minors and Certificates

Majors

Concentrations within a major are listed below the major.

*Secondary education certification is available in majors followed by an asterisk (*).

Bachelor of Arts

Accounting

Art and Archaeology

archaeology

art education (preK-12)

art history

studio arts

Biochemistry

Biology*

Business Administration

accounting

finance

human resource management

individual career interest

international economics and finance

marketing

Chemistry*

Communication Arts

digital media

Early Childhood Education

Economics

international economics

political economy

Elementary/Special Education

English*

creative writing

drama and theatre

literature

Environmental Science and Policy

environmental biology

environmental chemistry

environmental policy

French*

French/German

German

Global Studies

History*

public history

Integrated Marketing Communication

Latin American Studies

Law and Criminal Justice

    law

    criminal justice

Mathematics*

Middle Eastern Studies

Music

music history and literature

music performance

piano pedagogy

Philosophy

Political Science

Psychology

Religion

Social Work

Sociology

Spanish*

Bachelor of Science

Computational Science

molecular biology

ecology

chemistry

physics

Computer Science

Nursing

Pre-Professional Preparation

Pre-Dental Studies

Pre-Law Studies

Pre-Medical Studies

Pre-Veterinary Studies

The Single Major

Students enrolled in one major specialize in one of the fields Hood offers. Declaration of major is made during the spring of the sophomore year. An academic department may refuse to accept as a major, or may drop as a major, a student whose Grade Point Average in the discipline falls below 2.0.

The Double Major

As a double major, the student specializes in two of the fields Hood offers. At least one of these fields must be declared during the spring of the sophomore year. Students must identify the second major in the same manner during the spring of the junior year. Students should consult the appropriate department chairperson for assignment to a second adviser in the second major.

Double majors must meet the major requirements of both departments. The courses may count for requirements in both majors, but the credits can only count toward one major.

Students must confer with both advisers prior to each registration. In programs where there is great overlapping of requirements, a student may not double major (e.g., law and society and political science).

The Interdepartmental Major

The purpose of the major is to allow students with superior achievement to use the existing courses, curriculums and programs to structure an individualized program of studies with the guidance and assistance of a program advisory committee.

Working with the Program Advisory Committee, consisting of faculty members from the represented disciplines, the student submits a petition of interdepartmental major requirements no later than March 15 of the sophomore year to the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies for consideration. Transfer students with first-semester junior status must submit petitions no later than October 15 or March 15 of the first semester on campus.

To graduate as an interdepartmental major with an individually designed program, a student must have at least 15 credits in one of the areas represented in the major and at least 12 credits in another field for a total of at least 30 credits, 15 of which must be at the 300- or 400-level.  A 300- or 400-level capstone course is required. Approval is necessary before the student implements the program. The individualized program is a contract and, as such, is binding.

Students may count toward the major only those courses which are included in the program outline. (Courses within the disciplines contained in the interdepartmental major, but not included in the program outline, are considered electives.)

If a student wishes to revise the approved program, the primary adviser will assist and the Program Advisory Committee must approve the amended outline by majority vote. Any amendments must be submitted to the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies for approval. However, no significant changes will be permitted if the student is within 36 semester hours of graduation.

Minors

The following minors are offered at Hood:

Actuarial Science

African-American Studies

African Studies

American Studies

Archaeology

Art History

Biology

Business Administration

Chemistry

Classical Studies

Coastal Studies

Computer Science

Criminology and Delinquency

Economics

Environmental Studies

French

French/German

German

Gerontology

Global Studies

History

Journalism 

Literature

Management

Mathematics

Mathematics Education

Medieval Studies

Middle Eastern Studies

Music History and Literature

Music Performance

Philosophy

Physics

Political Science

Psychology

Public Relations

Religion

Renaissance Studies

Social Science Research

Social Work, Pre-Professional Practice

Sociology

Spanish

Studio Art

Theater and Drama

Web Development

Women’s and Gender Studies

Writing

Students may choose from a variety of programs which the College has designated as minor fields of study. The purposes of the program of minors are as follows:

  • To provide opportunities for students to pursue in a focused and integrated manner programs of study not currently available as majors;
  • To use existing resources to provide distinctive and challenging curricular opportunities;
  • To provide an alternative to double majors for students who wish to pursue more than one program of study;
  • To integrate further the liberal arts and career preparation through opportunities to combine a liberal arts major with a career-related minor or a career-related major with a liberal arts minor; and
  • To enable graduates to prepare for careers or further study in more than one area of concentrated knowledge.

The grouping of courses in a minor may be identical to a concentration. However, a concentration is elected by students within a major, while a minor is elected by students majoring in another field. The minor consists of a minimum of 15 credits of course work, forming a coherent program relating to a specific academic objective. Students are allowed to have two majors and a single minor, or a major and two minor fields. Minors are not required of students.

The following are requirements for a minor:

  • A minimum of 12 credits in the minor must be taken outside the student’s major and may not overlap with the major. If there is additional overlap, the credit must count in the major. The course may be used to fulfill a requirement in the minor, but the credit may count only in the major.
  • If a student elects a second minor, a minimum of 12 credits must be taken outside the first minor. Courses may be used to fulfill requirements in both minors, but the credit may count only in one minor.
  • Students must have a Grade Point Average of 2.0 in the minor and a minimum of 9 credits completed at Hood College for the minor to be listed on the academic record.
  • A maximum of 21 credits may be counted in the minor.
  • Courses counted in the minor may also count in the Core.
  • Declarations of a minor occur during the spring semester of the junior year when students submit the graduation audit, listing their intended minor field, to the Registrar’s Office.
  • Students may develop their own minor, with the approval of the department or departments that are teaching those classes relative to the student’s proposed minor and of the Committee on Academic Standards and Policies, provided they meet the minimum number of credits required of minors.

Secondary Education Certification

Hood offers preparation leading to state of Maryland secondary teaching certification (middle through high school) in eight subjects: biology, chemistry, English, French, history, mathematics or Spanish and art (preK-12). For more information, refer to both Education and the field in which you plan to major, in Majors and Programs of Study.

Certificates in Music Performance and Piano Pedagogy

Hood College offers two professional certificates in music for students who already possess a baccalaureate degree in a field other than music. The certificates may be earned in any of the applied music areas offered at Hood: voice, piano, organ, harpsichord, violin, viola, cello, double bass, trumpet, trombone, French horn, euphonium, tuba, clarinet, saxophone, flute, oboe and guitar, as well as piano pedagogy. For more information, see Music in Majors and Programs of Study.

Minors

Undergraduate Departments and Programs of Study